Blues

Showing 1–24 of 3465 results

  • Various - Trumpet Blues Rockers Shout Brother, Shout EP (7 single/EP)

    10,00

    Jumping Delta blues with a rootsy sparse style, passionate vocals, and tempestuous energy!!!!!!!

    Trumpet Jump Blues Rockers, Shout Brother, Shout features Willie Love, Elmer James aka Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup, Sonny Boy Williamson, and Tiny Kennedy. The Blues Men have honed these songs to perfection performing in the Nelson Street clubs and bars in Jackson, Mississippi. Three of these early 1950’s recordings are alternate takes, and not featured on the Mississippi Southern Bred series. Koko Mojo held them back because they were perfect for an EP, they are the sounds that Dee Jays play and people want. The EP is compiled by well-known Dee Jay Mark Armstrong, who has been Dee Jaying since his early teen years. Our EP’s have; sleeve notes, and the songs mastered for the best possible sound available. The EP is housed in an attractively designed heavy duty cardboard sleeve which has a stunning 1950’s design.

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  • Heartsman Johnny - Hot House Party EP (7 single/EP)

    10,00

    Looks at two West Coast-based and two little-known guitarists whose main employment was in the studio. Texan, Johnny Heartsman aka The Rhythm Rocker is featured with a Popcorn tune, and his double-sided instrumental hit with background interaction from the vocal group The Gaylarks. San Francisco Bay Area -bred Eugene Blacknell and His Savonics rare Guitar and Saxophone instrumental is ear-catching and groovy and additional a collector’s must-have. The EP is compiled by musician and artist Sven Uhrmann. Our EP’s have; sleeve notes, and the songs mastered for the best possible sound available.

    The EP is housed in an attractively designed heavy duty cardboard sleeve which has a stunning 1950’s design. 4 track 7inch EP, 45rpm, 350g PS, inside out print,
    STRICTLY limited to 500 copies

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  • Various - Koko-Mojo Diner Volume 4 – Rib Joint (CD)

    15,00

    THE ”MOJO” MAN SEZ: I’m proud to present a tasty selection of tunes about ”Soul Food” and other stuff black folks like to eat on four complementary volumes. If you don’t know what’s this all about let me put y’all wise: Soul food is an ethnic cuisine traditionally prepared and eaten by African Americans, originating in the Southern United States. This cuisine originated with the foods that were given to enslaved West Africans on southern plantations during the American colonial period; however, it was strongly influenced by the traditional practices of West Africans and Native Americans. Due to the historical presence of African Americans in the region, soul food is closely associated with the cuisine of the American South although today it has become an easily identifiable and celebrated aspect of mainstream American food culture. It fashioned from the meager ingredients available to the slave and sharecropper black families. The meat used was usually the least desirable cuts (stuff white people would throw away) and the vegetables, some bordering on weeds, were all that was available for the black slaves to prepare nutritious meals for their families. From these meager ingredients evolved a cuisine that is simple yet hearty and delicious… Every ethnic group has what it calls ”soul food” – soothing, comfort food that brings back warm memories of family dinners, however, today, the term ”soul food” simply means African-American cuisine. Do you like ”Kentucky Fried Chicken”? Colonel Sanders’ original Kentucky Fried Chicken recipe was stolen from a black woman. Do you like to eat Potato Chips? Thank a black chef named George Crum. Do you like Jack Daniel’s? A black man named Nathan “Nearest” Green taught Jack Daniel an ancient African technique that filtered liquor through a charcoal mellowing system. This technique is what gives Jack Daniel’s Whiskey its rich flavor and taste. Do you like to drink Coca-Cola or Pepsi-Cola? You can thank enslaved Africans. They brought the kola nut – one of the main parts of Coca-Cola – to what is now the United States. West Africans chewed the nut for its caffeine. Enslaved Africans also brought watermelon, okra, yams, black-eyed peas, and some peppers. These foods are commonly eaten in the U.S. today. They show how Africans forced into slavery – beginning in the 1500s – influenced the American diet. Frederick Opie wrote a book about some of the foods that connect Africa and America. The book is called ”Hog and Hominy: Soul Food from Africa to America.” Opie explains that people who were bringing enslaved Africans to North America wanted to keep them alive and earn a profit. As a result, Africans on the slave ships were fed food they knew and liked. Those foods landed along with the people. Opie explains that fruits and vegetables brought from Africa grew well in America. One reason is that enslaved Africans planted their own gardens to help feed themselves. In time, the plants from Africa slowly moved from gardens of the enslaved to those of the wealthy and powerful. For example, the homes of U.S. presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson had gardens planted with seeds from Africa. Those fruits and vegetables changed the way cooks made pies in America. In England, pies were made with meat. African-Americans took the English meat pie and made it with fruit or vegetables, such as sweet potatoes. Enslaved cooks developed gumbo, jambalaya, pepper pot, and a mix of green leafy vegetables and pork called Hoppin’ John. Some ways of cooking that are well-known in the U.S. today were reported in West Africa before 1500. They include deep-frying fish and barbecuing meats. These kinds of foods were critical to the creation of Southern, and in time American, food. Many of these foods with roots in African American culture came to be known as ”soul food.” The name was a way to identify food that African Americans began to create a long time ago to eat with dignity as enslaved people. The expression ”soul food” originated around 1960 when the word ”soul” began to be commonly and largely used to describe African American culture. Enjoy your meal, Y’all!
    Little Victor Mac (a.k.a. DJ ”Mojo” Man)

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  • Various - Koko-Mojo Diner Volume 3 – Southern Menu (CD)

    15,00

    THE ”MOJO” MAN SEZ: I’m proud to present a tasty selection of tunes about ”Soul Food” and other stuff black folks like to eat on four complementary volumes. If you don’t know what’s this all about let me put y’all wise: Soul food is an ethnic cuisine traditionally prepared and eaten by African Americans, originating in the Southern United States. This cuisine originated with the foods that were given to enslaved West Africans on southern plantations during the American colonial period; however, it was strongly influenced by the traditional practices of West Africans and Native Americans. Due to the historical presence of African Americans in the region, soul food is closely associated with the cuisine of the American South although today it has become an easily identifiable and celebrated aspect of mainstream American food culture. It fashioned from the meager ingredients available to the slave and sharecropper black families. The meat used was usually the least desirable cuts (stuff white people would throw away) and the vegetables, some bordering on weeds, were all that was available for the black slaves to prepare nutritious meals for their families. From these meager ingredients evolved a cuisine that is simple yet hearty and delicious… Every ethnic group has what it calls ”soul food” – soothing, comfort food that brings back warm memories of family dinners, however, today, the term ”soul food” simply means African-American cuisine. Do you like ”Kentucky Fried Chicken”? Colonel Sanders’ original Kentucky Fried Chicken recipe was stolen from a black woman. Do you like to eat Potato Chips? Thank a black chef named George Crum. Do you like Jack Daniel’s? A black man named Nathan “Nearest” Green taught Jack Daniel an ancient African technique that filtered liquor through a charcoal mellowing system. This technique is what gives Jack Daniel’s Whiskey its rich flavor and taste. Do you like to drink Coca-Cola or Pepsi-Cola? You can thank enslaved Africans. They brought the kola nut – one of the main parts of Coca-Cola – to what is now the United States. West Africans chewed the nut for its caffeine. Enslaved Africans also brought watermelon, okra, yams, black-eyed peas, and some peppers. These foods are commonly eaten in the U.S. today. They show how Africans forced into slavery – beginning in the 1500s – influenced the American diet. Frederick Opie wrote a book about some of the foods that connect Africa and America. The book is called ”Hog and Hominy: Soul Food from Africa to America.” Opie explains that people who were bringing enslaved Africans to North America wanted to keep them alive and earn a profit. As a result, Africans on the slave ships were fed food they knew and liked. Those foods landed along with the people. Opie explains that fruits and vegetables brought from Africa grew well in America. One reason is that enslaved Africans planted their own gardens to help feed themselves. In time, the plants from Africa slowly moved from gardens of the enslaved to those of the wealthy and powerful. For example, the homes of U.S. presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson had gardens planted with seeds from Africa. Those fruits and vegetables changed the way cooks made pies in America. In England, pies were made with meat. African-Americans took the English meat pie and made it with fruit or vegetables, such as sweet potatoes. Enslaved cooks developed gumbo, jambalaya, pepper pot, and a mix of green leafy vegetables and pork called Hoppin’ John. Some ways of cooking that are well-known in the U.S. today were reported in West Africa before 1500. They include deep-frying fish and barbecuing meats. These kinds of foods were critical to the creation of Southern, and in time American, food. Many of these foods with roots in African American culture came to be known as ”soul food.” The name was a way to identify food that African Americans began to create a long time ago to eat with dignity as enslaved people. The expression ”soul food” originated around 1960 when the word ”soul” began to be commonly and largely used to describe African American culture. Enjoy your meal, Y’all!
    Little Victor Mac (a.k.a. DJ ”Mojo” Man)

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  • Guy Buddy - Blues Singer (Käytetty CD)

    10,00

    The album is all acoustic and dedicated to John Lee Hooker with the line, ’In Memory of John Lee Hooker. You are missed’. Not known for his acoustic work, Buddy Guy unplugs for a rare album-length excursion into folk blues. The guitarist gets down and dirty with 12 tracks that sound like they were recorded after hours in his living room or on his back porch. Guy’s stinging leads are still evident as is his emotive voice, but both are less flamboyant in the unplugged setting.

    Accompanied by spare stand-up bass and brushed drums, Guy sounds nearly possessed on covers from Skip James (’Hard Time Killing Floor’), Johnny Shines (’Moanin’ and Groanin’), Son House (’Louise McGhee’), and John Lee Hooker (’Sally Mae’) among others. It’s a low-key, low-down affair made for late nights, rainy days and the saddest of moods. Guy is just as convincing here, arguably more so, as on his barnstorming electric albums, making Blues Singer one of the bravest and most poignant albums in his catalog. The album earned Guy the 2004 Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album.

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  • Corritone Bob & Friends - Spider In My Stew (CD)

    20,00

    Harmonica Ace Bob Corritore throws some wild blues parties and you are invited to enjoy his latest. SPIDER IN MY STEW continues Bob’s musical adventures with a fresh batch of 14 new selections featuring some of the greatest artists in the blues today! Amazing vocals, killer bands, memorable songs, passionate performances, and Bob’s exquisite harp! With Special Guests: Sugaray Rayford, Lurrie Bell, John Primer, Alabama Mike, Diunna Greenleaf, Francine Reed, Johnny Rawls, Oscar Wilson, Willie Buch, Bill & Shy Perry, Bob Stroger, Bob Margolin, Junior Watson, Kid Ramos, Johnny Main, Jimi ’Primetime’ Smith, Adrianna Marie, L.A. Jones, Fred Kaplan, Doug James, and more!

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  • Reed Jimmy - Mr. Luck: The Complete Vee-Jay Singles (3CD Boxset) (CD)

    35,00

    Jimmy Reed’s lazy drawl, high harmonica sound, and tightly constructed blues songs are part of the bedrock of American roots music. For a decade in the late 1950s and early 1960s, he was the most popular blues artist in America, crossing over to the pop charts with songs like ’Big Boss Man’ and ’Baby What You Want Me to Do.’ Blues, country and R&B artists, including Neil Young, The Rolling Stones, Etta James and Elvis Presley, have covered his compositions. Here are his complete Vee Jay singles-his defining body of work-newly remastered with notes from Grammy-winning blues producer Scott Billington.

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  • King Freddie - Blues Journey (Digipack) 3CD (CD)

    40,00

    Deluxe 3 CD Digipak. Over 30 tracks. Over 3 hours of prime Freddie King in concert from the ’70s. I was interested in the white rock ’n’ rollers until I heard Freddie King – and then I was over the moon. I knew that was where I belonged – finally. That was serious, proper guitar playing and I haven’t changed my mind ever since. I still listen to him and I get the same boost now that I did then.’ Eric Clapton. In a 1985 interview, Eric Clapton cited Freddy King’s 1961 B side I Love the Woman as the first time I heard that electric lead-guitar style, with the bent notes’ [it] started me on my path. Clapton shared his love of King with fellow British guitar heroes Peter Green, Jeff Beck and Mick Taylor, all of whom were profoundly influenced by King’s sharpened-treble tone and curt melodic hooks on iconic singles such as The Stumble, I’m Tore Down and Someday, After Awhile. Nicknamed The Texas Cannonball for his imposing build and incendiary live shows, King had a unique guitar attack. Steel on steel is an unforgettable sound, says Derek Trucks, referring to King’s use of metal banjo picks. But it’s gotta be in the right hands. The way he used it ’ man, you were going to hear that guitar. Trucks can still hear King’s huge impact on Clapton. When I played with Eric, Trucks said recently, there were times when he would take solos and I would get that Freddy vibe.’ King’s blues style was fluid, but with biting power that was arguably more forceful than that of many other bluesmen of his day. King used thumb and finger picks and would just dig into his Gibson 355 ’ hung precariously over just his right shoulder ’ creating what are now classic, deeply influential and riveting solos.

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  • Charlotta Curves & Helge Tallqvist Band - Voodoo Woman (CD)

    18,00

    Voodoo Woman sisältää vahvalla groovella soitettua blues/soul/funky -henkisiä biisejä. Kymmenestä biisistä yhdeksän on omaa tuotantoa, Tomi Leinon ja Charlotta Curvesin käsialaa. Äänitetty Tomi Leinon kuuluisassa analogisessa Suprovox studiossa. Soundi on sen myötä mehukas putkisoundi. Levyn tuottajana on Tomi Leino. Charlotta Curvesin yhdessä Helge Tallqvist Bandin kanssa luoma musiikki on rehellistä, vahvaa groovea ja sydäntä koskettavaa – se saa sielusi tanssimaan!

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  • Smith "Harmonica" George - …Of The Blues (CD)

    18,00

    George’s 1969 album recorded for Bluesway Records and first time on CD  The album features harpist Rod Piazza  Smith had joined Muddy Waters’ band in 1954 and also worked with Otis Rush in that period. He toured with luminaries such as Little Willie John and Champion Jack Dupree, and also recorded for various labels  Sadly, Smith died at the young age of 59 in 1983

    Digitally remastered and slipcased

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  • New Moon Jelly Roll Freedom Rockers - Volume 1 And 2 (2LP) (LP)

    49,50

    A weekend jam session that brought together two generations of top-shelf Blues musicians in an once-in-a-lifetime recording event produced by the NMJRFR. The results were released on two volumes in 2020 and 2021 on Stony Plain Records. Now available together on a double LP set, including download card.

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