CD

Showing 1–24 of 1415 results

  • Various - Koko-Mojo Diner Volume 4 – Rib Joint (CD)

    15,00

    THE ”MOJO” MAN SEZ: I’m proud to present a tasty selection of tunes about ”Soul Food” and other stuff black folks like to eat on four complementary volumes. If you don’t know what’s this all about let me put y’all wise: Soul food is an ethnic cuisine traditionally prepared and eaten by African Americans, originating in the Southern United States. This cuisine originated with the foods that were given to enslaved West Africans on southern plantations during the American colonial period; however, it was strongly influenced by the traditional practices of West Africans and Native Americans. Due to the historical presence of African Americans in the region, soul food is closely associated with the cuisine of the American South although today it has become an easily identifiable and celebrated aspect of mainstream American food culture. It fashioned from the meager ingredients available to the slave and sharecropper black families. The meat used was usually the least desirable cuts (stuff white people would throw away) and the vegetables, some bordering on weeds, were all that was available for the black slaves to prepare nutritious meals for their families. From these meager ingredients evolved a cuisine that is simple yet hearty and delicious… Every ethnic group has what it calls ”soul food” – soothing, comfort food that brings back warm memories of family dinners, however, today, the term ”soul food” simply means African-American cuisine. Do you like ”Kentucky Fried Chicken”? Colonel Sanders’ original Kentucky Fried Chicken recipe was stolen from a black woman. Do you like to eat Potato Chips? Thank a black chef named George Crum. Do you like Jack Daniel’s? A black man named Nathan “Nearest” Green taught Jack Daniel an ancient African technique that filtered liquor through a charcoal mellowing system. This technique is what gives Jack Daniel’s Whiskey its rich flavor and taste. Do you like to drink Coca-Cola or Pepsi-Cola? You can thank enslaved Africans. They brought the kola nut – one of the main parts of Coca-Cola – to what is now the United States. West Africans chewed the nut for its caffeine. Enslaved Africans also brought watermelon, okra, yams, black-eyed peas, and some peppers. These foods are commonly eaten in the U.S. today. They show how Africans forced into slavery – beginning in the 1500s – influenced the American diet. Frederick Opie wrote a book about some of the foods that connect Africa and America. The book is called ”Hog and Hominy: Soul Food from Africa to America.” Opie explains that people who were bringing enslaved Africans to North America wanted to keep them alive and earn a profit. As a result, Africans on the slave ships were fed food they knew and liked. Those foods landed along with the people. Opie explains that fruits and vegetables brought from Africa grew well in America. One reason is that enslaved Africans planted their own gardens to help feed themselves. In time, the plants from Africa slowly moved from gardens of the enslaved to those of the wealthy and powerful. For example, the homes of U.S. presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson had gardens planted with seeds from Africa. Those fruits and vegetables changed the way cooks made pies in America. In England, pies were made with meat. African-Americans took the English meat pie and made it with fruit or vegetables, such as sweet potatoes. Enslaved cooks developed gumbo, jambalaya, pepper pot, and a mix of green leafy vegetables and pork called Hoppin’ John. Some ways of cooking that are well-known in the U.S. today were reported in West Africa before 1500. They include deep-frying fish and barbecuing meats. These kinds of foods were critical to the creation of Southern, and in time American, food. Many of these foods with roots in African American culture came to be known as ”soul food.” The name was a way to identify food that African Americans began to create a long time ago to eat with dignity as enslaved people. The expression ”soul food” originated around 1960 when the word ”soul” began to be commonly and largely used to describe African American culture. Enjoy your meal, Y’all!
    Little Victor Mac (a.k.a. DJ ”Mojo” Man)

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  • Various - Koko-Mojo Diner Volume 3 – Southern Menu (CD)

    15,00

    THE ”MOJO” MAN SEZ: I’m proud to present a tasty selection of tunes about ”Soul Food” and other stuff black folks like to eat on four complementary volumes. If you don’t know what’s this all about let me put y’all wise: Soul food is an ethnic cuisine traditionally prepared and eaten by African Americans, originating in the Southern United States. This cuisine originated with the foods that were given to enslaved West Africans on southern plantations during the American colonial period; however, it was strongly influenced by the traditional practices of West Africans and Native Americans. Due to the historical presence of African Americans in the region, soul food is closely associated with the cuisine of the American South although today it has become an easily identifiable and celebrated aspect of mainstream American food culture. It fashioned from the meager ingredients available to the slave and sharecropper black families. The meat used was usually the least desirable cuts (stuff white people would throw away) and the vegetables, some bordering on weeds, were all that was available for the black slaves to prepare nutritious meals for their families. From these meager ingredients evolved a cuisine that is simple yet hearty and delicious… Every ethnic group has what it calls ”soul food” – soothing, comfort food that brings back warm memories of family dinners, however, today, the term ”soul food” simply means African-American cuisine. Do you like ”Kentucky Fried Chicken”? Colonel Sanders’ original Kentucky Fried Chicken recipe was stolen from a black woman. Do you like to eat Potato Chips? Thank a black chef named George Crum. Do you like Jack Daniel’s? A black man named Nathan “Nearest” Green taught Jack Daniel an ancient African technique that filtered liquor through a charcoal mellowing system. This technique is what gives Jack Daniel’s Whiskey its rich flavor and taste. Do you like to drink Coca-Cola or Pepsi-Cola? You can thank enslaved Africans. They brought the kola nut – one of the main parts of Coca-Cola – to what is now the United States. West Africans chewed the nut for its caffeine. Enslaved Africans also brought watermelon, okra, yams, black-eyed peas, and some peppers. These foods are commonly eaten in the U.S. today. They show how Africans forced into slavery – beginning in the 1500s – influenced the American diet. Frederick Opie wrote a book about some of the foods that connect Africa and America. The book is called ”Hog and Hominy: Soul Food from Africa to America.” Opie explains that people who were bringing enslaved Africans to North America wanted to keep them alive and earn a profit. As a result, Africans on the slave ships were fed food they knew and liked. Those foods landed along with the people. Opie explains that fruits and vegetables brought from Africa grew well in America. One reason is that enslaved Africans planted their own gardens to help feed themselves. In time, the plants from Africa slowly moved from gardens of the enslaved to those of the wealthy and powerful. For example, the homes of U.S. presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson had gardens planted with seeds from Africa. Those fruits and vegetables changed the way cooks made pies in America. In England, pies were made with meat. African-Americans took the English meat pie and made it with fruit or vegetables, such as sweet potatoes. Enslaved cooks developed gumbo, jambalaya, pepper pot, and a mix of green leafy vegetables and pork called Hoppin’ John. Some ways of cooking that are well-known in the U.S. today were reported in West Africa before 1500. They include deep-frying fish and barbecuing meats. These kinds of foods were critical to the creation of Southern, and in time American, food. Many of these foods with roots in African American culture came to be known as ”soul food.” The name was a way to identify food that African Americans began to create a long time ago to eat with dignity as enslaved people. The expression ”soul food” originated around 1960 when the word ”soul” began to be commonly and largely used to describe African American culture. Enjoy your meal, Y’all!
    Little Victor Mac (a.k.a. DJ ”Mojo” Man)

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  • Various - Rock And Roll Vixens 6 (CD)

    15,00

    Jatkoa mahtavaan KOKO MOJO sarjaan naisrokkareista.

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  • 5 Royales - The ”5” Royales – Rock (CD)

    18,00

    1-CD (Digipak) with 36-page booklet, 31 tracks. Total playing time approx. 79 min.

    With the fantastic Five Royales, we introduce another significant element in the transformation of African-American music from gospel to R&B to soul in our ’Rocks’ CD-series.
    Bear Family outlines the vocal quintet’s journey from a pure gospel group to one of rhythm ’n’ blues’ most successful formations.
    From their beginnings on Apollo Records to their outstanding recordings for King, we deliver the quintet’s best powerful songs.
    The energetic playing of guitarist Lowman Pauling, Jr. influenced later peers such as Steve Cropper, who was instrumental in shaping the Stax sound in the ’60s.
    Competent and meticulously researched liner notes by Chicago black music expert Bill Dahl in the richly illustrated booklet – 6-page digipak.

    Like Clyde McPhatter and Ray Charles, The “5” Royales played a seminal role in combining melismatic gospel vocals with rhythm and blues lyrics and instrumentation to help invent soul music. The powerhouse vocal quintet from Winston-Salem, North Carolina started out belting spirituals exclusively, but after signing with New York’s Apollo Records in 1951 detoured onto a secular route. They were unabashed rockers, as Bear Family’s new compilation of their sides makes abundantly clear, from their earliest Apollo classics (1953’s R&B chart-topper Baby Don’t Do It and the delightfully ribald Laundromat Blues are prime examples) through their prolific heyday on the King label.

    Their principal source of material, Lowman Pauling, Jr., unleashed his previously undocumented lead guitar work from 1957 on so lethally that it became a prime component of the Royales’ attack, slashing through their ’57 hit Think and deeply influencing Stax guitar king Steve Cropper’s developing style. The unholy marriage of sanctified and secular never rocked harder than when The “5” Royales were positioned behind a microphone!

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  • McPhatter Clyde - The Ballads Of Clyde McPhatter (CD)

    18,00

    1-CD (4-plated Digipak) with 32-page booklet, 29 tracks. Total playing time approx. 79 min.

    We can’t rewrite music history, but we would like to shine a light on a great, influential and underrated artist: Clyde McPhatter.
    Whoever is interested in the history of American pop music will know the Drifters and the Dominoes – two formations, characterized and famous for the fantastic voice of the lead singer: Clyde McPhatter.
    With two simultaneously released CD documentaries on Bear Family we honor the great life achievement of an important crossover artist, who has significantly influenced genres such as gospel, doo-wop, rhythm & blues and pop.
    Our ’Clyde McPhatter Rocks’ CD (Bear Family BCD17614) features Clyde’s rousing up-tempo numbers; now here is the compilation of his most moving ballads on CD, carried by one of the most beautiful black voices of her time!
    Extensive liner notes by Chicago expert Bill Dahl, detailed richly illustrated booklet and premier sound quality.

    Few soulful voices of the 1950s and ’60s could caress a ballad the way Clyde McPhatter did, seemingly without even trying. He could make any song soar heaven-bound with his gospel-soaked curlicues and unpredictable twists and turns, helping greatly to define the concept of soul music. Bear Family’s bountiful collection of the rhythm and blues legend’s ballad output takes an in-depth look at his seminal Atlantic Records years, focusing on his solo period but also including a handful of dreamiest entries as lead singer of The Drifters as well as both sides of his duet single with Ruth Brown. Clyde’s Treasure Of Love, the wrenching Without Love (There Is Nothing), and Just To Hold My Hand were major solo hits for Atlantic. There’s also a generous helping of McPhatter’s subsequent M-G-M and Mercury output. Clyde will always rank with soul music royalty—and these majestic ballads testify as to why he’s such a regal figure.

    When Clyde McPhatter died in 1972, impoverished, addicted to alcohol and plagued by depression, the world looked back on a 22-year recording career of an exceptional musician who died at only 39 years of age. At the age of five, he was already singing in the gospel choir of his father, a Baptist preacher in North Carolina. The family eventually moved to New York City, where Clyde formed a gospel formation, the Mount Lebanon Singers, in the late 1940s. As a singer, he won a coveted ’Amateur Night’ trophy at the legendary Apollo Theatre in Harlem in 1950 and accepted an offer to become the lead tenor singer with Billie Ward & The Dominoes, one of the most popular R&B vocal groups in the entire country.

    In 1953, McPhatter parted ways with Ward, was tracked down and signed by Atlantic head, Ahmed Ertegun. Condition: the formation of his own vocal group. The result: The Drifters. But he also left this formation after only a few years and concentrated on a solo career. He recorded the first great achievements, parted with Atlantic Records, switched to M-G-M and later Mercury. But further great successes and especially recognition failed to materialize. Frustrated, he moved to England for two years in 1968, tried an ineffective comeback after his return and died of multiple organ failure on June 13, 1972.

    McPhatter left us a magnificent legacy of melancholy ballads. The unique singer truly deserved more recognition during his lifetime!
    To complement this compilation of his best ballads, we recommend ’Clyde McPhatter Rocks’ (BCD17614), featuring the outstanding up-tempo songs of Clyde McPhatter.

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  • Various - Spring Fever – 28 Easter Nuggets For Your Spring Season (CD)

    10,00

    1 CD with 16-page booklet, 28 tracks. Total playing time approx. 67 minutes.

    The second edition on the subject of spring and Easter In Bear Family’s ’Season’s Greetings’ CD series.
    This musical journey through time includes selected titles from four decades, springtime songs and popular hits from 1936 to 1963.
    Genre-spanning, from jazz and pop to country and R&B to rock ’n’ roll – and always hard on the subject – here the rooster and the hen go crazy, the eggs rock & roll and the Easter bunny dances!
    Rock with fiery guitars comes from Vilas Craig, Link Wray and Tina’s former husband, a.o.
    Also danceable teen rock can be heard! First and foremost Bobby Rydell with a rare number as well as some Doo Wop groups like The Pentagons and The Velvets.
    Speaking of rare, Bear Family also delivers some tracks on CD for the first time this time, including recordings by Ray Coleman, The Jaye Brothers, Al Allen, Jerry Duane and others!
    The full-color 16-page booklet includes comments by the producer on each song and, as always, is richly illustrated!

    Spring Fever
    Yes, the spring fever. Everyone feels it, as soon as the first warm sunbeams let nature awake to new life. Good keyword, this compilation also lets us awake to new life, even in Corona times! With these rhythms and the swinging sound, Easter eggs can be painted in no time. Or better yet, shake a leg! It’s Spring Fever!

    The musical spring
    This Bear Family CD has it all again. Once again we deliver a wide musical range from 1936 to 1963. But far from it, the oldest recording is not jazz, it comes from the Dixon Brothers and is pure original Country Blues. Country music in its traditional form is also provided by Bill Wimberly & The Country Rhythm Boys. But also jazz can be heard from such illustrious artists as Django Reinhardt, Ramsey Lewis and the Andrews Sisters.

    Along with hot rock ’n’ roll and rockabilly rhythms, there’s plenty to discover from pop to twist, including famous artists with rare recordings, such as Pat Boone’s classic ’April Love’, here as a rare film version, or Ray Anthony with the Bookends and his rare twist version of ’Bunny Hop’. With the CD comes a full-color 16-page booklet with accompanying text on the individual songs and artists, written by the producer, as well as many photos and illustrations!

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  • Various - Mojo Man Special Volume 4 -Voodoo Man – Dancefloor Killers (CD)

    15,00

    The Mojo Man presents 24 dancefloor killers from his collection! 4th volume (of 10 killer releases).

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  • Various - Rock And Roll Vixens 5 (CD)

    15,00

    Jatkoa mahtavaan KOKO MOJO sarjaan naisrokkareista.

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  • Various - Beware of the Sleepwalking Woman (Koko-Mojo Original series) # 26 (CD)

    15,00

    The good folks at England’s Koko Mojo Records have assembled the kind of compilation that is almost too delicious for words. Only killer no filler compilation by Little Victor, remastering by Black Shack Recordings, Calw, Germany.

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  • Various - Boss Black Rockers Vol 10 : Eeny Meeny Minie Moe (CD)

    15,00

    Kymmenes ja viimeinen osa! PARASTA sarjaa ikinä.

    The incomparable DJ ”Mojo” Man (a.k.a. Little Victor) presents the 10th and final volume of this interesting and very successful series focused on the originators of rock and roll and the very first ”rockers” so to speak, African American artists. This CD sounds like an upgraded and improved modern-day version of the legendary STOMPIN’ and many similar ”unofficial” albums that first made the World aware of so many great forgotten obscure tracks nowadays regarded as ”classic” of the genre. The artwork is simply fantastic and the back of the CD (like all the compilations by the ”Mojo” Man) mentions the original label and catalogue number, so it’s easy for a record collector to score an original copy. Once again too many good songs to mention here. This collection features 28 tracks even if it’s hard for any human mind to remember more than 20 or 24 songs by different artists. It’s really a ”Super Big Gulp” of a record diabolically designed to quench any thirst of any size – even if in real life a ”Big Gulp” drink usually gets flat and warm before you can finish it and the ice already starts melting while you are sipping half-way thru it. It’s another ”All Fine Frame – No Parts Lame” CD but the highlights of this volumes are probably the rare rockin’ version of ”Bloodshot Eyes” that Wynonie Harris re-recorded for Roulette, ”Teenage Party” by Sonny Knight, a black version of ”Raunchy” by Ernie Freeman and the original recording of the Little Richard-style number ”Messing With The Kid” by Junior Wells on Chief Records. Junior is mostly regarded as a bluesman nowadays but he recorded songs in many different styles during his long career. This was his contribution to the rock and roll craze of the late 1950s. Wells recorded this number many times in a more “bluesy” vein and the song is considered a blues standard today.

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  • Cobb Danny - My Isabella (CD)

    13,00

    The First ever solely Danny Cobb album.

    This album is presented in a top quality laminated card wallet with a 16 page booklet. A full discography covering all 19 recordings.

    The booklet also included 30 photos of original record labels and various advertising of Danny Cobb work. The Cover features a fantastic artist impression of Danny Cobb by Berto Martinez of Spain.

    A TOP Quality album of all Danny Cobbs recordings made under his own name on the record labels.

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  • Various - Do It Up Right- Tuning The Guitar For New Adventures (Vol.25) (CD)

    15,00

    Alunperin piti päättyä 24 osaan, mutta ei vaan päättynyt. PALJON LISÄÄ hyvää matskua tulossa.

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  • Various - Rock And Roll Vixens 4 (CD)

    15,00

    Jatkoa mahtavaan KOKO MOJO sarjaan naisrokkareista.

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  • Sly & the Viscaynes - Yellow Moon: Complete Recordings 1961-1962 (CD)

    20,00

    The amazing, unpredictable, one and only Sly Stone has never made a secret of his innocuous beginnings as a teenaged hopeful in Vallejo, California in the early 1960s. His earliest experiences as a musician and performer on the path to future glories would act as a signal lesson for the youthful Sylvester Stewart in the realities of the music business. A trio of singles with his interracial high school vocal group the Viscaynes, followed by two more releases as a solo, recorded in Los Angeles with producer George Motola, comprise the fascinating apprenticeship Sly needed to undergo on the road to fame. For decades, Sly’s juvenilia has been treated with cynical disdain by a parade of disingenuous collections, most with low-fidelity sound, artificially extended versions, and tracks by unrelated artists. Even recent releases have continued to use the wrong versions of tracks first heard on these exploitative 70s-era compilations. ”Yellow Moon: The Complete Recordings 1961-1962” rectifies this injustice by offering up Sly and the Viscaynes’ entire output from the correct master sources. The earliest tracks are drawn from recently discovered tapes and include the extremely rare B-side ’Real, True Love’, the first disc on which Sly sang lead. There are also several unissued demo tracks produced by teen idol and Viscaynes mentor Gary Stites, as well as the sought-after Jasper Woods 45, featuring an incognito Richard Berry with the Viscaynes on vocal support. The package comes with an extensive liner note by compiler Alec Palao, with much heretofore unpublished information and fresh interview material from the group and associates, as well as commentary from Sly himself. ”Yellow Moon: The Complete Recordings 1961-1962” is truly the last word on Sly Stone’s very first phase.

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