CD

Näytetään tulokset 1–24 / 1423

  • Dorsey Lee - Night People-The Best Of (3CD) (CD)

    40,00

    Limited edition of 2000 copies. Rarities, Hits & Unreleased songs & Photos.
    Beautiful package – 3 CDs in a gatefold digibook. 24 page booklet with photos and liner notes.
    All tracks remastered for this release!

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  • Various - Destination Forbidden Planet – 37 Outer Space Shock Treatments (CD)

    10,00

    1-CD jewelcase with 16-page booklet, 37 tracks. Total playing time approx. 79 min.

    Whether ’Forbidden Planet’ or ’Visitors from Space’ – here the fan of 1950s Sci-Fi movies gets his money’s worth! 

    This release in Bear Family’s ’Destination’ series deals with the unexplainable, the other dimension, and last but not least with interplanetary horror – but it also really rocks out.
    37 tracks from 1951-1965 answer the most urgent questions: does the forbidden planet exist, and are there beings from outer space?
    Of course, we hear various interpretations by famous artists, including Louis Prima, Billy Lee Riley or Judy Garland!
    In addition, plenty of unknown rarities that would have deserved chart success, many of them for the first time on CD!
    Furthermore: two exceptional guitarists in a class of their own: Billy Mure and George Barnes! Both with outstanding Outer Space instrumentals!
    Artists from different nations, among others Freddy Sunder from Belgium and Winifred Atwell and Don Lang from Great Britain.
    This extraterrestrial music cocktail is rounded off with original movie trailers and some monumental orchestral interludes ? la David Rose and Jimmie Haskell.
    The 16-page color booklet contains info on each track by producer Marc Mittelacher and many photos and illustrations, some of them rare.

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  • Pinocchio James - 21 Original Recordings (CD)

    13,00

    Pinnochio James had a fabulous deep rich voice and sang jump blues, jazz, blues, RnB and Rock n roll. He fronted Orchestras led by people such as Lionel Hampton and Todd Rhodes at a time when the leader was the star and the singer was part of the ensemble. Hopefully this collection of his records will bring him the attention he deserves.

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  • King Ben E. - Don’t Play That Song (CD)

    13,00

    Although BEN E. KING’s name is synonymous with The Drifters, he only actually sang on a dozen tracks with them, most of which were recorded concurrent with the start of his own solo career.

    This compilation anthologises Ben’s solo recordings between 1960-62, presenting his early singles plus a handful of standout album tracks.

    All his early hits are included, viz: the Drifters-like ’First Taste Of Love’, his first million-seller ’Spanish Harlem’, his signature song ’Stand By Me’, the lilting Latin shuffle of ’Amor’, the dramatic, bluesy ’Here Comes The Night’/’Young Boy Blues’, his Sex’n’Soul double-sider ’Ecstasy’/’Yes’, the explosive ’Don’t Play That Song’, the soulful ’Too Bad’, the haunting ’I’m Standing By’ and Goffin & King’s ’Tell Daddy’.

    The LP tracks featured herein include memorable covers of songs like ’My Heart Cries For You’, ’He Will Break Your Heart’, ’Dream Lover’, ’Will You Love Me Tomorrow’, ’It’s All In The Game’, etc.

    This is a truly magnificent, almost faultless body of work.

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  • Joe Van Loan - The Great Group and Solo Vocals of Joe Van Loan – Yesterday’s Roses 1949-1962 (CD)

    13,00

    Joe Van Loan possessed an awesome falsetto tenor voice that enhanced the recordings of many great doo wop vocal groups of the 1950s.

    Best known for his tenure with The Ravens, who he eventually led for some years. He also sung with The Dixieaires, The Bells and The Ink Spots. Also featured on this interesting collection are several of his solo recordings.

    Several of these tracks are highly collectable and are making their debut on CD.

    Fully detailed liner notes.

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  • Various - I Love Paris – The Great American Songbook Goes R&B (CD)

    13,00

    Although for many decades it was principally the domain of jazz-styled singers and musicians, THE GREAT AMERICAN SONGBOOK has undergone a significant revival in recent years, in terms of the mass market’s rediscovery of the genre.

    Loosely defined, these are the most popular and enduring songs from the 1920s through to the 50s, most of which were written for Broadway theatre, musical theatre and/or Hollywood musical movies.

    And although regular Pop Music has generally endured a somewhat difficult relationship with what has always been perceived as ’serious’ music, many R&B and early Soul performers dabbled in the Great American Songbook over the years.

    This unique compilation presents thirty memorable examples, featuring artists like Ray Charles, Big Maybelle, Jackie Wilson, Little Willie John, LaVern Baker, James Brown, Etta James, Bobby Bland, Timi Yuro, Ruth Brown and many more.

    Many of these sides are hard to find elsewhere on CD.
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  • Various - Juke Joint Jump – Throw a Little Boogie – 30 Slices of Rockin’, Boppin’, Boogie and Blues (CD)

    13,00

    Here are thirty slices of hot, rocking blues recorded and performed for just one purpose – dancing, getting down and having a real good time. This music was made for jukeboxes and specifically for jukeboxes in African American areas of the United States be they rural or urban.

    The music on this collection and its companion ’Juke Joint Jump – ’Whole Lotta Drinkin’ on the Block’ (JASMCD3172) was recorded between 1944 and 1960.

    The urban juke joints or ’clubs’ especially those in Chicago, were very influential in the rise of R&B across America during the 1950s and most of the big stars of blues performed regularly in these clubs and this is the era in which most of the music on these two volumes emanated.

    Despite the passage of time, these 30 recordings rock with a vengeance that should satisfy anyone’s dancing feet. So, just like they did back in the day, roll back the carpet, pour yourself a drink and just let the good times roll.

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  • Williams Tony - The Signature Voice of The Platters – Volume 2, 1961-1962

    13,00

    The Platters were one of the world’s most successful vocal groups during the 1950s, with thirty-five hit records in The States alone, of which seven or eight were million sellers, including four US #1s.

    The lead singer on all of these was the mercurial TONY WILLIAMS, a man with a perfect voice.

    He quit The Platters in 1961 to pursue a solo career, signing with Frank Sinatra’s new Reprise label, for whom he debuted with an LP, ’Tony Williams Sings His Greatest Hits’ and a couple of singles, ’Sleepless Nights’ and ’The Miracle’.

    He moved to the Philips label the following year, for the ’The Magic Touch Of Tony’ LP and an impossibly rare 45, ’Chloe’ / ’Second Best’.

    The two compilations in this ’mini-series’ anthologise Tony’s solo recordings between 1955-62, chronologically; Volume 1 deals with 1955-61, and Volume 2, with 1961-62.

    Volume 2 comprises his Reprise and Philips recordings, which are nigh impossible to find elsewhere on CD.

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  • Williams Tony - The Signature Voice of The Platters – Volume 1, 1955-1961 (CD)

    13,00

    The Platters were one of the world’s most successful vocal groups during the 1950s, with thirty-five hit records in The States alone, of which seven or eight were million sellers, including four US #1s.

    The lead singer on all of these was the mercurial TONY WILLIAMS, a man with a perfect voice.

    Williams also occasionally cut solo records during the 50s and he eventually quit The Platters in 1961 to pursue a solo career, signing with Frank Sinatra’s new Reprise label, for whom he debuted with an LP, ’Tony Williams Sings His Greatest Hits’ and a couple of singles, ’Sleepless Nights’ and ’The Miracle’.

    The two compilations in this ’mini-series’ anthologise Tony’s solo recordings between 1955-62, chronologically; Volume 1 deals with 1955-61, and Volume 2, with 1961-62.

    Volume 1 comprises his solo Mercury releases, notably his LP ’A Girl Is A Girl Is A Girl’ (1959); a couple of Platters singles on which he was given featured billing; and his early Reprise sides.

    Tony’s Reprise recordings are almost impossible to find elsewhere on CD.

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  • Various - Juke Joint Jump – Whole Lotta Drinkin’ On The Block – 30 Slices of Rockin’, Boppin’, Boogie and Blues (CD)

    13,00

    Here are thirty slices of hot, rocking blues recorded and performed for just one purpose – dancing, getting down and having a real good time. This music was made for jukeboxes and specifically for jukeboxes in African American areas of the United States be they rural or urban.

    The music on this collection and its companion ’Juke Joint Jump – ’Boogie Like You Wanna’ (JASMCD3173) was recorded between 1944 and 1960.

    The urban juke joints or ’clubs’ especially those in Chicago, were very influential in the rise of R&B across America during the 1950s and most of the big stars of blues performed regularly in these clubs and this is the era in which most of the music on these two volumes emanated.

    Despite the passage of time these 30 recordings rock with a vengeance that should satisfy anyone’s dancing feet. So, just like they did back in the day, roll back the carpet, pour yourself a drink and just let the good times roll.

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  • Various - We Did ’Em First – Obscure, Lost & Forgotten Originals (CD)

    13,00

    Collecting records can be an ongoing voyage of discovery, particularly when you find out that a record you love is not the original version (my blood still runs cold when I recall my daughter asking me who that Don McLean bloke thought he was, singing Madonna’s ’American Pie’).

    Buy this compilation, and find out who cut the original versions of million-selling numbers like ’His Latest Flame’, ’Take Good Care Of My Baby’, ’All Shook Up’, ’He’ll Have To Go’, ’Johnny Angel’, ’Release Me’, ’Twist And Shout’, ’Go Away Little Girl’, ’Detroit City’, ’He’s A Rebel’, ’Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On’, ’Rave On’, and many more.

    Featured artists herein range from big name artists like Elvis Presley, Cliff Richard, Del Shannon, Bobby Vee, Dion, Joan Baez, Johnnie Ray, Roger Miller, Wanda Jackson, Ral Donner, etc., to downright unknown/obscure names like Gil Hamilton, David Hill, Eddie Miller, Georgia Lee, Chase Webster, Georgie Shaw, Bruce Bruno and Yvonne Fair.

    Many of these lesser known tracks have never previously appeared on CD.

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  • Maresca Ernie - Shout! Shout! Knock Yourself Out! (CD)

    13,00

    Far better known as a songwriter than singer, ERNIE MARESCA’s brief recording career nonetheless yielded the R&R classic, ’Shout! Shout! (Knock Yourself Out)’, which guaranteed him a pride of place entry in the pantheon of ’One-Hit Wonders’.

    This compilation presents Maresca’s entire recorded output for the Seville label between 1960-62, including both the mono and stereo mixes of his irresistible hit.

    The sixteen bonus tracks feature a number of celebrated performances of his songs, including his three all-time biggest hits, Dion’s definitive versions of ’Runaround Sue’, ’The Wanderer’ and ’Lovers Who Wander’.

    Also featured are The Belmonts, The Regents, Nino & The Ebb Tides, Ricky Shaw and Billy Fury, the latter with a cheeky UK re-imagining one of his lesser-known Popcorn killers.

    Maresca’s recordings are notoriously hard to find elsewhere on CD, and this is the first compilation to present a coherent career overview, including some of the hits he wrote for other artists.

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  • George Barbara - I Know – The A.F.O. & Sue Years (CD)

    13,00

    Barbara George is, alongside Fats Domino, Lee Dorsey, Aaron Neville and Ernie K. Doe, one of the best known singers to come out of New Orleans.

    She was instrumental in the early success of the A.F.O. label, set up as an artist’s co-operative in New Orleans in 1961.

    Her self-penned hit ’I Know’ was the label’s only big hit, reaching number 3 on Billboard magazine’s Hot 100 and spending 4 weeks at number one on America’s R&B chart. It remains one of the most popular of all the records produced in New Orleans.

    The follow-up ’You Talk About Love’ made number 46 on the Hot 100 after which she was lured away from A.F.O. and signed directly to the New York Sue label where she had another Hot 100 hit with ’Send For Me’ later in 1962.

    This CD package collects together her A.F.O. and Sue sides along with all the tracks from her only LP, named after her biggest hit ’I Know’. Eighteen tracks chronicling the best of Barbara George.

    The accompanying booklet includes all writing and publishing credits, label scans and contemporary music press adverts as well as Barbara George’s history from her days in New Orleans and her move to New York, a classic case of a bigger label exerting its power over a smaller competitor.

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  • Various - Koko-Mojo Diner Volume 4 – Rib Joint (CD)

    15,00

    THE ”MOJO” MAN SEZ: I’m proud to present a tasty selection of tunes about ”Soul Food” and other stuff black folks like to eat on four complementary volumes. If you don’t know what’s this all about let me put y’all wise: Soul food is an ethnic cuisine traditionally prepared and eaten by African Americans, originating in the Southern United States. This cuisine originated with the foods that were given to enslaved West Africans on southern plantations during the American colonial period; however, it was strongly influenced by the traditional practices of West Africans and Native Americans. Due to the historical presence of African Americans in the region, soul food is closely associated with the cuisine of the American South although today it has become an easily identifiable and celebrated aspect of mainstream American food culture. It fashioned from the meager ingredients available to the slave and sharecropper black families. The meat used was usually the least desirable cuts (stuff white people would throw away) and the vegetables, some bordering on weeds, were all that was available for the black slaves to prepare nutritious meals for their families. From these meager ingredients evolved a cuisine that is simple yet hearty and delicious… Every ethnic group has what it calls ”soul food” – soothing, comfort food that brings back warm memories of family dinners, however, today, the term ”soul food” simply means African-American cuisine. Do you like ”Kentucky Fried Chicken”? Colonel Sanders’ original Kentucky Fried Chicken recipe was stolen from a black woman. Do you like to eat Potato Chips? Thank a black chef named George Crum. Do you like Jack Daniel’s? A black man named Nathan “Nearest” Green taught Jack Daniel an ancient African technique that filtered liquor through a charcoal mellowing system. This technique is what gives Jack Daniel’s Whiskey its rich flavor and taste. Do you like to drink Coca-Cola or Pepsi-Cola? You can thank enslaved Africans. They brought the kola nut – one of the main parts of Coca-Cola – to what is now the United States. West Africans chewed the nut for its caffeine. Enslaved Africans also brought watermelon, okra, yams, black-eyed peas, and some peppers. These foods are commonly eaten in the U.S. today. They show how Africans forced into slavery – beginning in the 1500s – influenced the American diet. Frederick Opie wrote a book about some of the foods that connect Africa and America. The book is called ”Hog and Hominy: Soul Food from Africa to America.” Opie explains that people who were bringing enslaved Africans to North America wanted to keep them alive and earn a profit. As a result, Africans on the slave ships were fed food they knew and liked. Those foods landed along with the people. Opie explains that fruits and vegetables brought from Africa grew well in America. One reason is that enslaved Africans planted their own gardens to help feed themselves. In time, the plants from Africa slowly moved from gardens of the enslaved to those of the wealthy and powerful. For example, the homes of U.S. presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson had gardens planted with seeds from Africa. Those fruits and vegetables changed the way cooks made pies in America. In England, pies were made with meat. African-Americans took the English meat pie and made it with fruit or vegetables, such as sweet potatoes. Enslaved cooks developed gumbo, jambalaya, pepper pot, and a mix of green leafy vegetables and pork called Hoppin’ John. Some ways of cooking that are well-known in the U.S. today were reported in West Africa before 1500. They include deep-frying fish and barbecuing meats. These kinds of foods were critical to the creation of Southern, and in time American, food. Many of these foods with roots in African American culture came to be known as ”soul food.” The name was a way to identify food that African Americans began to create a long time ago to eat with dignity as enslaved people. The expression ”soul food” originated around 1960 when the word ”soul” began to be commonly and largely used to describe African American culture. Enjoy your meal, Y’all!
    Little Victor Mac (a.k.a. DJ ”Mojo” Man)

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  • Various - Koko-Mojo Diner Volume 3 – Southern Menu (CD)

    15,00

    THE ”MOJO” MAN SEZ: I’m proud to present a tasty selection of tunes about ”Soul Food” and other stuff black folks like to eat on four complementary volumes. If you don’t know what’s this all about let me put y’all wise: Soul food is an ethnic cuisine traditionally prepared and eaten by African Americans, originating in the Southern United States. This cuisine originated with the foods that were given to enslaved West Africans on southern plantations during the American colonial period; however, it was strongly influenced by the traditional practices of West Africans and Native Americans. Due to the historical presence of African Americans in the region, soul food is closely associated with the cuisine of the American South although today it has become an easily identifiable and celebrated aspect of mainstream American food culture. It fashioned from the meager ingredients available to the slave and sharecropper black families. The meat used was usually the least desirable cuts (stuff white people would throw away) and the vegetables, some bordering on weeds, were all that was available for the black slaves to prepare nutritious meals for their families. From these meager ingredients evolved a cuisine that is simple yet hearty and delicious… Every ethnic group has what it calls ”soul food” – soothing, comfort food that brings back warm memories of family dinners, however, today, the term ”soul food” simply means African-American cuisine. Do you like ”Kentucky Fried Chicken”? Colonel Sanders’ original Kentucky Fried Chicken recipe was stolen from a black woman. Do you like to eat Potato Chips? Thank a black chef named George Crum. Do you like Jack Daniel’s? A black man named Nathan “Nearest” Green taught Jack Daniel an ancient African technique that filtered liquor through a charcoal mellowing system. This technique is what gives Jack Daniel’s Whiskey its rich flavor and taste. Do you like to drink Coca-Cola or Pepsi-Cola? You can thank enslaved Africans. They brought the kola nut – one of the main parts of Coca-Cola – to what is now the United States. West Africans chewed the nut for its caffeine. Enslaved Africans also brought watermelon, okra, yams, black-eyed peas, and some peppers. These foods are commonly eaten in the U.S. today. They show how Africans forced into slavery – beginning in the 1500s – influenced the American diet. Frederick Opie wrote a book about some of the foods that connect Africa and America. The book is called ”Hog and Hominy: Soul Food from Africa to America.” Opie explains that people who were bringing enslaved Africans to North America wanted to keep them alive and earn a profit. As a result, Africans on the slave ships were fed food they knew and liked. Those foods landed along with the people. Opie explains that fruits and vegetables brought from Africa grew well in America. One reason is that enslaved Africans planted their own gardens to help feed themselves. In time, the plants from Africa slowly moved from gardens of the enslaved to those of the wealthy and powerful. For example, the homes of U.S. presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson had gardens planted with seeds from Africa. Those fruits and vegetables changed the way cooks made pies in America. In England, pies were made with meat. African-Americans took the English meat pie and made it with fruit or vegetables, such as sweet potatoes. Enslaved cooks developed gumbo, jambalaya, pepper pot, and a mix of green leafy vegetables and pork called Hoppin’ John. Some ways of cooking that are well-known in the U.S. today were reported in West Africa before 1500. They include deep-frying fish and barbecuing meats. These kinds of foods were critical to the creation of Southern, and in time American, food. Many of these foods with roots in African American culture came to be known as ”soul food.” The name was a way to identify food that African Americans began to create a long time ago to eat with dignity as enslaved people. The expression ”soul food” originated around 1960 when the word ”soul” began to be commonly and largely used to describe African American culture. Enjoy your meal, Y’all!
    Little Victor Mac (a.k.a. DJ ”Mojo” Man)

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  • Various - Rock And Roll Vixens 6 (CD)

    15,00

    Jatkoa mahtavaan KOKO MOJO sarjaan naisrokkareista.

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  • 5 Royales - The ”5” Royales – Rock (CD)

    18,00

    1-CD (Digipak) with 36-page booklet, 31 tracks. Total playing time approx. 79 min.

    With the fantastic Five Royales, we introduce another significant element in the transformation of African-American music from gospel to R&B to soul in our ’Rocks’ CD-series.
    Bear Family outlines the vocal quintet’s journey from a pure gospel group to one of rhythm ’n’ blues’ most successful formations.
    From their beginnings on Apollo Records to their outstanding recordings for King, we deliver the quintet’s best powerful songs.
    The energetic playing of guitarist Lowman Pauling, Jr. influenced later peers such as Steve Cropper, who was instrumental in shaping the Stax sound in the ’60s.
    Competent and meticulously researched liner notes by Chicago black music expert Bill Dahl in the richly illustrated booklet – 6-page digipak.

    Like Clyde McPhatter and Ray Charles, The “5” Royales played a seminal role in combining melismatic gospel vocals with rhythm and blues lyrics and instrumentation to help invent soul music. The powerhouse vocal quintet from Winston-Salem, North Carolina started out belting spirituals exclusively, but after signing with New York’s Apollo Records in 1951 detoured onto a secular route. They were unabashed rockers, as Bear Family’s new compilation of their sides makes abundantly clear, from their earliest Apollo classics (1953’s R&B chart-topper Baby Don’t Do It and the delightfully ribald Laundromat Blues are prime examples) through their prolific heyday on the King label.

    Their principal source of material, Lowman Pauling, Jr., unleashed his previously undocumented lead guitar work from 1957 on so lethally that it became a prime component of the Royales’ attack, slashing through their ’57 hit Think and deeply influencing Stax guitar king Steve Cropper’s developing style. The unholy marriage of sanctified and secular never rocked harder than when The “5” Royales were positioned behind a microphone!

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  • McPhatter Clyde - The Ballads Of Clyde McPhatter (CD)

    18,00

    1-CD (4-plated Digipak) with 32-page booklet, 29 tracks. Total playing time approx. 79 min.

    We can’t rewrite music history, but we would like to shine a light on a great, influential and underrated artist: Clyde McPhatter.
    Whoever is interested in the history of American pop music will know the Drifters and the Dominoes – two formations, characterized and famous for the fantastic voice of the lead singer: Clyde McPhatter.
    With two simultaneously released CD documentaries on Bear Family we honor the great life achievement of an important crossover artist, who has significantly influenced genres such as gospel, doo-wop, rhythm & blues and pop.
    Our ’Clyde McPhatter Rocks’ CD (Bear Family BCD17614) features Clyde’s rousing up-tempo numbers; now here is the compilation of his most moving ballads on CD, carried by one of the most beautiful black voices of her time!
    Extensive liner notes by Chicago expert Bill Dahl, detailed richly illustrated booklet and premier sound quality.

    Few soulful voices of the 1950s and ’60s could caress a ballad the way Clyde McPhatter did, seemingly without even trying. He could make any song soar heaven-bound with his gospel-soaked curlicues and unpredictable twists and turns, helping greatly to define the concept of soul music. Bear Family’s bountiful collection of the rhythm and blues legend’s ballad output takes an in-depth look at his seminal Atlantic Records years, focusing on his solo period but also including a handful of dreamiest entries as lead singer of The Drifters as well as both sides of his duet single with Ruth Brown. Clyde’s Treasure Of Love, the wrenching Without Love (There Is Nothing), and Just To Hold My Hand were major solo hits for Atlantic. There’s also a generous helping of McPhatter’s subsequent M-G-M and Mercury output. Clyde will always rank with soul music royalty—and these majestic ballads testify as to why he’s such a regal figure.

    When Clyde McPhatter died in 1972, impoverished, addicted to alcohol and plagued by depression, the world looked back on a 22-year recording career of an exceptional musician who died at only 39 years of age. At the age of five, he was already singing in the gospel choir of his father, a Baptist preacher in North Carolina. The family eventually moved to New York City, where Clyde formed a gospel formation, the Mount Lebanon Singers, in the late 1940s. As a singer, he won a coveted ’Amateur Night’ trophy at the legendary Apollo Theatre in Harlem in 1950 and accepted an offer to become the lead tenor singer with Billie Ward & The Dominoes, one of the most popular R&B vocal groups in the entire country.

    In 1953, McPhatter parted ways with Ward, was tracked down and signed by Atlantic head, Ahmed Ertegun. Condition: the formation of his own vocal group. The result: The Drifters. But he also left this formation after only a few years and concentrated on a solo career. He recorded the first great achievements, parted with Atlantic Records, switched to M-G-M and later Mercury. But further great successes and especially recognition failed to materialize. Frustrated, he moved to England for two years in 1968, tried an ineffective comeback after his return and died of multiple organ failure on June 13, 1972.

    McPhatter left us a magnificent legacy of melancholy ballads. The unique singer truly deserved more recognition during his lifetime!
    To complement this compilation of his best ballads, we recommend ’Clyde McPhatter Rocks’ (BCD17614), featuring the outstanding up-tempo songs of Clyde McPhatter.

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  • Various - Spring Fever – 28 Easter Nuggets For Your Spring Season (CD)

    10,00

    1 CD with 16-page booklet, 28 tracks. Total playing time approx. 67 minutes.

    The second edition on the subject of spring and Easter In Bear Family’s ’Season’s Greetings’ CD series.
    This musical journey through time includes selected titles from four decades, springtime songs and popular hits from 1936 to 1963.
    Genre-spanning, from jazz and pop to country and R&B to rock ’n’ roll – and always hard on the subject – here the rooster and the hen go crazy, the eggs rock & roll and the Easter bunny dances!
    Rock with fiery guitars comes from Vilas Craig, Link Wray and Tina’s former husband, a.o.
    Also danceable teen rock can be heard! First and foremost Bobby Rydell with a rare number as well as some Doo Wop groups like The Pentagons and The Velvets.
    Speaking of rare, Bear Family also delivers some tracks on CD for the first time this time, including recordings by Ray Coleman, The Jaye Brothers, Al Allen, Jerry Duane and others!
    The full-color 16-page booklet includes comments by the producer on each song and, as always, is richly illustrated!

    Spring Fever
    Yes, the spring fever. Everyone feels it, as soon as the first warm sunbeams let nature awake to new life. Good keyword, this compilation also lets us awake to new life, even in Corona times! With these rhythms and the swinging sound, Easter eggs can be painted in no time. Or better yet, shake a leg! It’s Spring Fever!

    The musical spring
    This Bear Family CD has it all again. Once again we deliver a wide musical range from 1936 to 1963. But far from it, the oldest recording is not jazz, it comes from the Dixon Brothers and is pure original Country Blues. Country music in its traditional form is also provided by Bill Wimberly & The Country Rhythm Boys. But also jazz can be heard from such illustrious artists as Django Reinhardt, Ramsey Lewis and the Andrews Sisters.

    Along with hot rock ’n’ roll and rockabilly rhythms, there’s plenty to discover from pop to twist, including famous artists with rare recordings, such as Pat Boone’s classic ’April Love’, here as a rare film version, or Ray Anthony with the Bookends and his rare twist version of ’Bunny Hop’. With the CD comes a full-color 16-page booklet with accompanying text on the individual songs and artists, written by the producer, as well as many photos and illustrations!

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  • Various - Mojo Man Special Volume 4 -Voodoo Man – Dancefloor Killers (CD)

    15,00

    The Mojo Man presents 24 dancefloor killers from his collection! 4th volume (of 10 killer releases).

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