CD

Näytetään tulokset 73–96 / 444

  • Thomas Carla - The Memphis Princess – Early Recordings 1960-1962 (CD)

    13,00

    Memphis native Carla Thomas was the first artist to bring success to the fledgling Stax label when her debut solo 45 ’Gee Whiz (Look At His Eyes)’ broke into the US Hot 100 in late 1960. That record established the teenage Carla – who frequently wrote her own songs as well as performing them – as one of the foremost soul ladies of the whole of that decade, and well into the next one. She was a big star in soul circles, and possibly could have been an even bigger one had she not made her studies a priority over her music career.

    This new Jasmine collection brings together every recording that Carla made during her formative years as Memphis’ Princess Of Soul – her first album in its entirety and in stereo where possible, plus a number of single only tracks and mono single mixes, including four duets with her equally famous father Rufus Thomas. Many of these were also a hit on either the Pop or R&B charts, and frequently on both! Needless to say, as with all Jasmine packages it’s beautifully remastered from the best available sources.

    Carla stopped recording in 1975, but she will always be revered among soul fans for the work she did in helping to make Memphis the epicentre of 60s soul music in the American South. She returned to performing in 2017 and still features many of the songs in this collection in her shows today.

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  • Various - Listen People – The Graham Gouldman Songbook 1964-2005 (CD)

    18,00

    From the Mockingbirds to McFly, two dozen exemplary songs by one of the UK’s most celebrated writers. 

    In the mid-60s barely a month went by when Graham Gouldman’s name did not feature in the UK charts under the title of a current hit. The young Mancunican wrote regularly for some of the biggest artists of the time – including Herman’s Hermits, the Mindbenders, the Yardbirds and the Hollies – as well as maintaining his own recording career in several groups, some real and others fictional aggregations that Graham and his chums in what became 10cc invented within the confines of their Strawberry Studios. His prolific nature was matched by a prodigious success rate. Almost everything Graham wrote for the acts that kept coming back for more was a hit somewhere in the world.

    If anyone is overdue for inclusion in Ace’s Songwriter Series, it is Graham Keith Gouldman. “Listen People” brings together two dozen of his finest and most successful songs from a career that’s about to enter its 55th year, mostly performed by those who took them into the charts. It starts with his first recorded song, by his group the Mockingbirds from 1965, and ends with a collaboration with noughties teen sensations McFly. As you will hear from this carefully chosen selection, Graham has stayed totally in step with musical trends throughout his career.

    Of Graham’s peers, probably only Paul McCartney, Ray Davies, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards can lay claim to similar songwriting longevity. Like those veterans, Graham is still out there on the road, successfully plying his trade with two separate shows – one featuring the hits of 10cc and the other focusing on the hits he wrote for others, including many of those heard here. In fact, as this is being written he’s packing his bags for a Scandinavian tour, with more gigs already scheduled for 2018.

    TONY ROUNCE

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  • Various - Northern Soul’s Classiest Rarities Volume 6 (CD)

    18,00

    High-quality dance records from across the Northern Soul spectrum – floor-fillers, chin-strokers, the esoteric and the sometimes obvious. 

    It’s nearly three years since the last volume of this respected series. The eye-opener on this new collection will be the previously unissued version of ‘I Only Cry Once A Day Now’, a superb Gene Page arrangement treasured by the Puffs on Doré but performed here by the mighty Fidels. Fellow Los Angeles vocal group the Hyperions contribute the catchy and exciting ‘Why You Wanna Treat Me The Way You Do’, and the Lon-Genes’ rare single ‘Dream Girl’ gives further kudos to that city’s soul reputation. Difosco (aka Dee Ervin) recorded the ebullient ‘Sunshine Love’ for another Los Angeles imprint, Earthquake, and its standing among collector’s continues to grow, while we finally put out the correct brass-filled version of Peggy Woods’ great mid-80s discovery ‘Love Is Gonna Get You’ for the first time on CD.

    Much-travelled soul ambassador Sidney Barnes has licensed us his super-rare production of ‘I Wanted To Tell You’ by Little Nicky Soul and later under-the-radar creations on Andre Scott and Jean Carter. He has also added substantially to the booklet notes in an illuminating and entertaining manner. Sid’s Detroit production partner, soon-to-be superstar George Clinton, offers up ‘You Won’t Say Nothing’ by Tamala Lewis, one of the earliest works from hisNew Jerseydays. That disc eventually became a Northern Soul classic, as did Jackie Day’s ‘Naughty Boy’, Johnnie Taylor’s ‘Friday Night’ and Betty Turner’s ‘The Winds Kept Laughing’. An even more established gem is given an interesting twist in a newly acquired early version of Maxine Brown’s ‘One In A Million’; the subtle differences make it an aural thrill.

    The Just Productions tapes have turned up an earlier version of Jack Ashford’s ‘I’ll Fly To Your Open Arms’, called simply ‘I Can Fly’, by great vocal group the Magnificents. The Detroit Emeralds’ LP-only ‘Long Live The King’ is finding favour with soul fans recently and sounds vibrant here. More Detroit quality comes via a recent tape discovery from O.C. Tolbert, whose distinctive vocals give Dave Hamilton’s ‘(Marriage Is Only) A State Of Mind’ a soulful twist. There are two majestic big beat ballads from the vaults of Los Angeles arranger Jack Nitzsche: Nooney Rickett’s unissued ‘Sad Tomorrows’ and Daniel A Stone’s terrific take on ‘Young Boy Blues’. Jock Mitchell’s moody and mysterious ‘Nomad Woman’ fits snugly between the pair. Two excellent early soul rarities come from Chicago soul stalwarts the Vows and the Kittens, while it’s over to Memphis for a pretty Carla Thomas recording (unreleased until 1992) called ‘Little Boy’, the perfect ender to this collection of treasures.

    ADY CROASDELL

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  • Carr James - The Best Of (CD)

    13,00

    A 20-track CD by the man regarded by many as the greatest-ever soul singer.

    2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the release on Goldwax of James Carr’s recording of ‘The Dark End Of The Street’, a record rightly hailed as a benchmark in soul, and in southern soul in particular. James’ recording of Dan Penn and Chips Moman’s genre-defining song is one of dozens but it was the first and is by unanimous consensus the best.

    Here at Ace we wanted to do something to commemorate the anniversary. The first and most logical thought was to put out commemorative reissue of the single but we also wanted to do something for album and CD fans. Although we have extensively anthologised James’ catalogue in the past, we’ve never released a “Best Of” CD before. This mid-priced set is aimed primarily at those who know a few of James’ tracks and would like to get to know his discography better. For long-time fans the disc provides an ideal opportunity to get all of James’ Billboard R&B and pop chart hits in one place for the first time. And for fans of a more traditional medium of listening we also present a vinyl configuration with fewer tracks but still featuring all the hits and more.

    James was truly one of soul music’s finest singers, up there with Otis Redding, Sam Cooke, Aretha Franklin and Jackie Wilson in the pantheon of the greatest soul music makers. It’s a shame he didn’t make more records but those he released on Goldwax between 1965 and 1971 have few equals. If you enjoy “The Best Of James Carr” we strongly urge you to check out the rest of his Goldwax recordings, every single one of which is available on Kent.

    TONY ROUNCE

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  • Hayes Isaac - The Spirit Of Memphis (1962-1976) 4CD + 7″ Single (CD)

    69,00

    The Spirit of Memphis (1962-1976) chronicles the ascension of one of the greatest American musical talents the world has ever seen. From his humble beginnings as an orphaned sharecropper to his time as a session player, house songwriter, and producer for Stax Records, to his arrival as an artist in his own right as “Black Moses,” Hayes became a symbol for what was possible for Black America, perhaps best encapsulated by his barrier-busting Oscar-win for Best Original Song with “Theme From Shaft” in 1972.

    This four-CD set includes both songs written and produced by Hayes and performed by the other artists (Sam & Dave’s “Soul Man,” Carla Thomas’ “B-A-B-Y”), as well as a collection of Hayes’ best-loved hits (“Walk On By,” “Theme from Shaft”), plus a wealth of previously unreleased material. This essential collection examines the many facets of Isaac Hayes’ career and provides an essential survey of one of the most influential, genre-defining artists in American music history.

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  • Rawls Johnny - Waiting For The Train (CD)

    18,00

    The soulful vocalist has been garnering major accolades and his winning streak continues with Waiting For The Train. The bass player/co-composer Bob Trenchard leads the same band as on Johnny’s last outing, complete with the four-piece horn section and pumping rhythm section that made his previous disc, Tiger In A Cage such a widely-acclaimed release. The album leaves the listener wanting more, which–all things considered–cannot be viewed as anything but a good thing. –Living Blues Magazine, October 2017

    Across eight Catfood albums since 2005, Johnny Rawls’ singing has displayed sincere, easeful emoitional engagement with intelligent lyrics form one song after another written with his trusty bassist, Bob Trenchard. And the streak continues. Note the intimacy he brings to the ballad Stay With Me and the bravura that spurs the song’s uncontained glee over making a fresh start on Rain Keep Falling. Never flagging in spirit, Trenchard and the other ace musicians again incorporate elements of Southern soul, Texas blues and classic pop-soul into their infectious group sound. (Waiting For The Train is on the 2017 Downbeat Best Albums of the Year List) –Frank-John Hadley, Downbeat Magazine

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  • Carter Clarence - Testifyin` & Patches (Two albums on 1 CD + bonus) (CD)

    18,00

    Recorded at FAME in 1969 and 1970, the great southern soul man’s third and fourth albums, with bonus tracks making their CD debut.

    There’s a sign on the unprepossessing brown building that is the home of FAME Studios which proclaims it to be the Home Of The Muscle Shoals Sound. It’s a message that is as true now as it was in the second half of the 1960s, when FAME was the recording home of stars as diverse as Candi Staton and the Osmonds and the studio’s flagship artist was consistent hit-maker Clarence Carter.

    Between 1967 and 1973 Clarence brought hit after hit to the R&B and pop charts, all supervised by Rick Hall, FAME’s founder and owner to this day. Hits such as ‘Slip Away’, ‘Looking For A Fox’, ‘Too Weak To Fight’ and ‘Thread The Needle’ were crucial to the establishment of the studio’s sound and a great advertisement for what it had to offer to any artist who was looking for some Muscle Shoals fairy dust to enhance their careers.

    During that time Clarence had five albums issued, all of extremely high quality and equally popular with album-buyers of the period. Kent has already brought you the first two on CD, with a bonus of rare and previously unissued material. This new package compiles Clarence’s third and fourth albums – “Testifyin’” and “Patches”, from 1969 and 1970 – and adds three tracks from a 1971 session that have only previously appeared on a now-deleted limited edition vinyl EP. The two albums feature seven R&B Top 30 hits, most of which also crossed over to the pop charts, including Clarence’s version of the Chairmen Of The Board’s ‘Patches’, his biggest global hit. Individually the albums represent the end of one era at FAME and the beginning of another, as the studio’s second great rhythm section, the Swampers, who play on “Testifyin’”, gave way to its third, the Fame Gang, who can be heard on the “Patches” album and the bonus material.

    Clarence was at the peak of his popularity at the time, and would be a chart regular for the next five years, until disco knocked southern soul for six. The selections here show why he is still regarded as one of his era’s premier soul men, and why FAME remains known as the Home Of The Muscle Shoals Sound.

    TONY ROUNCE

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  • Various - Let’s Do The Boogaloo (CD)

    18,00

    Infectious American dance music that united soul, jazz and latin.

    The boogaloo is an ill-defined genre, which for years has almost been written out of black music history and handed over to New York’s Hispanic population, and mixed with its close cousin latin-soul. But as noted in We Like It Like That, Mathew Ramirez Warren’s excellent documentary of that scene, bandleader Richie Ray created the first latin boogaloo after seeing African-Americans in his audience doing the dance at one of his shows, which prompted him to funk up a guajira and create ‘Lookie Lookie’.

    “Let’s Do The Boogaloo” attempts to tell a fuller story, tracing the roots of the dance back to a stolen Motown backing track and comedy duo Tom & Jerrio from the dance’s hometown of Chicago taking ‘The Boogaloo’ to the upper reaches of the charts in 1965. We look at where the beat came from, why ‘Lookie Lookie’ had plenty of latin antecedents, and how the success lingered on in the years after the initial breakthrough.

    Whereas most dances disappeared within months, one of the biggest boogaloo hits – ‘Boogaloo Down Broadway’ by the Fantastic Johnny C – reached its peak in early 1968, and boogaloo records even resurfaced in hip hop in the 1980s. The latin world took the sound even more to heart, and boogaloos have a tendency to reappear even now. So what made the boogaloo so enduring? Other than it is incredibly good music, there doesn’t appear to be a definitive answer.

    This compilation has music recorded in the North, South, East and West between 1965 and 1968. It takes in big names attempting to cash in on the latest dance craze plus new artists and producers trying out this exciting music. The beat is often messed with, and sometimes – such as in Lou Courtney’s ‘Me And You (Doin’ The Boogaloo)’ – stretched so far that you wonder if what you are hearing really is still a boogaloo. The sounds though are irresistible – the groove is often on the cusp of funk and always danceable. Listen to the latin-style horns on Prince & Princess’ ‘Ready, Steady, Go’, the almost mechanical syncopation of Roy Lee Johnson’s ‘Boogaloo #3’ or the frenetic hysteria of Hector Rivera’s ‘Playing It Cool’ and you are aware that this is music that is vibrant and exciting.

    DEAN RUDLAND

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  • Various - Doing Our Thing – More Soul From Jamdown 1972-1982 (CD)

    18,00

    1-CD Digipak (4-sided) with 32-page booklet, 17 tracks. Total playing time c. 61:55 Second volume in Cree’s CD/2-LP-series with Jamaican cover versions of US soul tunes A perfect companion to ’Sly & Robbie Present Taxi Gang In Disco Mix Style 1978-87’ Compiled by reggae historian, Steve Barrow Fabulous selection featuring some of Jamaica’s greatest ever singers, deejays, musicians and producers Artists include Dave Barker, BB Seaton, Junior Byles, Augustus Pablo, Glen Adams, Willie Lindo, Lloyd Charmers, Cedric Brooks, Richard Ace, a.o. Sleeve notes from Steve Barrow and Noel Hawks and superb photographs from Dave Hendley Available on compact disc and 180-gram vinyl (2-LP set) Cover versions have always been an integral part of Jamaican music and an indication of the wide-ranging influences on reggae and the versatility and adaptability of its artists, musicians and producers in their approach to music making. Anything and everything could be, and has been, incorporated into the mix over the years but it is what reggae’s artists, producers and engineers did with their sources that make their cover versions so special and so vitally important; in many cases their versions have travelled so far from their starting point that they are virtually unrecognisable. This set, compiled by reggae historian Steve Barrow, not only demonstrates the massive influence of American soul and disco releases on Jamaican music but also showcases the wholly original approach of Jamaica’s musical maestros. The track listing for ’Doing Our Thing’ reads like a roll call of some of the best of Jamaica’s greatest ever singers, deejays, musicians and producers and the selection opens with one of reggae’s first ever artists to break into the international charts. In 1971 the inimitable Dave Barker, as one half of ’Dave & Ansel Collins’, hit all around the globe with Double Barrelwhich was inspired by two American records The Funkie Moonby Smokey Johnson & Company and Party Timeby Ramsey Lewis. Dave could sing every bit as well as he could deejay and both sides of his tremendous talent are featured here. Accomplished veteran vocalists including John Holt, Alton Ellis and his sister Hortense, BB Seaton and Junior Byles rub shoulders here with the magnificent musicianship of Augustus Pablo, Glen Adams, Willie Lindo, Lloyd Charmers, Cedric Brooks, Richard Ace alongside lessons from the Jamaican deejay school with Dillinger and the aforementioned Dave Barker. The set concludes with an example of the nascent dance hall style from Phillip Frazer, ”sharp like a razor”, welding two hits from The Manhattans over the ’One Step Beyond’ rhythm. The music makers from Jamaica had always leaned on American, Cuban, and occasionally British, elements in creating their magic and, in doing so, attained their own voice whose worldwide reputation is out of all proportion to its humble beginnings and circumstances. Like the Jamaican people, whose motto is ”out of many, one people”, the roots of Jamaican music are embedded deep in the music of elsewhere but as its branches grew they too spread worldwide. The subsequent repercussions have been of serious significance to the music of the past forty years. Its worldwide influence has long overtaken and superseded its origins: the massive sound systems, dub (the ’remix’), Jamaican MCs and deejays (rap). In fact, the whole transmission system of ’dance music’ was pioneered in Jamaican dance halls, which are not ’halls’ at all since most dances are open air affairs, where as Josie Wales says ”you could skank your life away…”. Both the vinyl and compact disc are accompanied by extensive contextual and historical sleeve notes from Steve Barrow and Noel Hawks and superb photographs from Dave Hendley. This release is respectfully and affectionately dedicated to Dave’s memory and his insightful vision

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  • Springfield Dusty - The Complete Philadelphia Sessions – A Brand New Me (CD)

    20,00

    Having issued collections of her lost 1971 Jeff Barry produced sessions (Faithful) and her entire 1970-1971 U.K. sessions (Come for a Dream), we have made chronicling the hallowed early ’70s period of Dusty Springfield’s career something of a mission here at Real Gone Music. And we have saved what just might be the best for last-this collection brings together, for the first time ever, all of the historic recordings made by Dusty at Sigma Sound Studios in Philadelphia with Gamble-Huff Productions for Atlantic Records. The 17 selections cover the ten 1969 recordings issued on Springfield’s 1970 album A Brand New Me- including the hit title song-plus 7 additional tracks from 1970 including the single ”I Wanna Be a Free Girl,” outtakes not issued until the 1990s on various compilations, and a previously unreleased track, ”Sweet Charlie.” Additionally, because former iterations of this material have not been sonically quite up to snuff, each track is newly-remixed from the original multitrack masters by Ted Carfrae! Liner notes by Joe Marchese and rare images from Dusty’s own collection complete this invaluable look at the seductive Ms. Springfield’s foray into the Philly Soul sound. Put this together with our other Real Gone Dusty retrospectives and you have the full picture of Dusty’s recordings from 1969-1971 that immediately followed her Dusty in Memphis pinnacle!!

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  • Cooke Sam - Win Your Love For Me (Complete Single Sides 1956-1962) (2CD) (CD)

    18,00
    This remastered and essential 2CD edition gathers all the single A & B sides Sam Cooke made as a leader for different labels, such as Specialty, Keen, SAR and RCA-Victor, between 1956 and 1962.
    It contains the finest moments and most celebrated songs of his career. Unlike his albums, which to a large extent were meant for an adult audience, Cooke’s singles were oriented towards teenagers and chart success.
    His legacy represents a fundamental cornerstone of soul, R&B and gospel. All of these fabulous tracks continue to stand the test of time. There’s no better proof of Sam Cooke’s genius than these soulful, joyous, exuberant, stylish and passionate recordings.
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  • Pickett Wilson - Let Me Be Your Boy – The Early Years 1957-62 (CD)

    13,00

    • The great Wilson Pickett brought the gruff, throaty power of his gospel-trained voice to bear on some of the most incendiary soul music of the Sixties. Born in Alabama but raised in Detroit, he began singing in a local gospel-harmony group called The Violinaires. In 1959, he crossed over into secular music and joined The Falcons. In addition to Pickett, The Falcons included future soul stars Eddie Floyd and Sir Mack Rice.

    • This collector’s edition presents a wide selection of those early recordings Wilson Pickett cut between 1957 and 1962 – as a soloist artist, or with The Falcons, The Violinaires or The Spiritual Five. This material was issued by different small labels such as Correc-Tone, Cub, Double-L and Lupine.

    Soul staples like “I Found a Love,” “If You Need Me” (covered by The Rolling Stones), and “It’s Too Late” were all R&B hits for the singer before he hooked up with Atlantic Records.

    Some of these recordings aren’t available on other collections, nor have these seminal tunes ever been previously compiled on one CD. Although he eventually went on to greater commercial success in the mid- and late ‘60s, all of these remastered gems form the building blocks of Wilson Pickett’s musical legacy.

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  • Burke Solomon - Solomon Burke + If You Need Me + 6 bonus tracks (CD)

    13,00

    • Solomon Burke’s force-of-nature singing combined gospel fervour, country gentility and R&B grit. His emotionally charged voice could swing from a satiny croon to a gruff soul shout.

    • This release includes two of his finest long players from his early career:his eponymous debut album and the equally splendid “If You Need Me”. Both records are widely regarded as landmarks of early ‘60s soul. Six bonus tracks have been added

    • Definitive remastered edition. Detailed illustrated booklet

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  • Jackson Chuck - Big New York Soul: Wand Records 1961-1966 (CD)

    18,00

    Kent released the best of Chuck Jackson’s Wand recordings on Good Things (CDKEND 935) in 1990. Since then Kent has issued all of Chuck’s eight Wand LPs on four CDs. A review of the tapes from the Wand trawl of the mid-80s, along with recent tape discoveries, means Kent can issue a final CD of previously unreleased tracks and rarities. Of the eight previously unheard songs debuting here, the highlights are the perky opener Things Just Ain’t Right , a tremendous cover of the Curtis Mayfield-written Need To Belong, originally covered by Jerry Butler and Anymore, a duet with Dionne Warwick, a teaming never before heard. They have also included Little By Little, a great uptempo dancer only previously released on the 1987 Kent LP A Powerful Soul which is long deleted and The Silencer, a secret agent-styled film theme tune which was only released on compilation CDs in the 90s. There is also a demo of In Between Tears, previously only available on a Kent LP.

    There are two very good B-sides; For All Time and And That’s Saying A Lot which have never before appeared on CD. Some collectors may know And That’s Saying A Lot from Christine Perfect’s cover on her first solo LP. Additionally Big New York is included as it has only appeared on the In The Naked City CD, which is now deleted.

    A recent flurry of Internet activity saw Chuck fans amazed that the very popular Hand It Over was issued in two quite different vocal versions over two different Wand release numbers. Kent include the version that has eluded a CD release up until now. A later recording of Forget About Me, which was first featured on Good Things, is also included with a very different vocal and a small mistake corrected from the initial attempt.

    Although the rest of Chuck’s material was issued on the two-LPs-on-one CD series, this was mainly in stereo and we have obtained mono versions of such great numbers as If I Didn’t Love You , I’ve Got To Be Strong and This Broken Heart (That You Gave Me) . Another Day and King Of The Mountain also get the mono treatment, and sit well with a third unissued Bob Crewe and the 4 Seasons-related track Through My Tears and provide an interesting side-story.

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  • Byrd Bobby - Help For My Brother: The Pre-Funk Singles 1963-68 (CD)

    18,00

    For twenty years Bobby Byrd was James Brown’s right-hand man. In the latter part of this time he recorded some ground-breaking funk such as the much-sampled I Know You Got Soul produced by Brown. Before that he had spent the 1960s recording a series of 45s, all produced by Brown. This is the first-ever compilation of that work. Byrd’s family helped rescue Brown from his time in prison in the early 50s. Byrd then let Brown join his vocal group which was the starting point for his singing career. Byrd led his backing group the Famous Flames from this point on. When Brown had established himself well enough to make records with members of his revue, Byrd was top of the list of those he wanted to record.

    This compilation shows the power of both Brown as a producer and Byrd as a singer.

    24 songs have Brown pushing the sound of R&B and soul, looking for the next successful direction for his music. These recordings, released on Federal, Smash and King, are the missing links in the development of James Brown’s music and, as such, are historically important as well as fantastically good music.

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  • Various - Mainstream Modern Soul 2 (1969-1972) (CD)

    18,00

    High quality 70s soul from a professional and inspired soul stable.

    The Mainstream family of labels was a major source of black music through the early and mid-70s. Owner Bob Shad was primarily a jazz producer but had enough nous and appreciation of soul music to go with current trends. His in-house arrangers included veteran hit-maker Bert DeCoteaux, fellow jazzer Wade Marcus and the up-and-coming Patrick Adams.Adams’ production on Chapter Three’s ‘I’ll Never Be The Same’ is soul with an early disco beat, and Chocolate Syrup’s uptempo ‘You’ve Got A Lot To Give’ is of a similar ilk.

    Mainstream had several great harmony vocal groups – Special Delivery, the Steptones and Eleventh Commandment all contribute excellent examples of the genre. ‘Oh My Love’, the rarely seen or heard flip of Almeta Lattimore’s ‘These Memories’, sounds equally haunting and is one of several great Detroit productions co-opted onto Mainstream. Others include McArthur’s very soulful ‘I’ll Never Trust Love Again’, Charles Beverly’s ‘Grass Ain’t Greener’ and the Steptones’ ‘Your Love Is Like The Rising Sun’. Charles Colbert is a mystery artist whose Mainstream tape of ‘Slow Down World’ debuts here, while Sugar Billy Garner recorded for the Fast Track subsidiary four years after his New Day recording of ‘I Got Some’.

    Shad clearly dug southern soul and licensed in tracks from Lee Bates, Lenny McDaniel and Randolph Brown; he even issued a southern ballad by Count Willie & The Dukes. The jazz influence can be felt mainly from female singers Ellerine Harding, Nia Johnson and Alice Clark – all of whom benefited from Mainstream’s jazz track record. Jeany Reynolds made an impressive debut on Mainstream some years before her disco hits as Jeannie, while veteran New York balladeer Lenny Welch offers the neglected ‘When There’s No Such Thing As Love (It’s Over)’. Collectively, the 23 tracks here maintain Mainstream’s quality 70s soul reputation.

    ADY CROASDELL (Ace Records)

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  • Pickett Wilson - Wilson Pickett Sings Bobby Womack (CD)

    20,00

    Songs by Womack, vocals by Pickett. Complete and together at last.

    Between 1966 and 1968 soul great Wilson Pickett recorded no less than 17 songs written by an up-and-coming singer/songwriter with whom he had much in common stylistically. Bobby Womack’s own time as a regular hit-maker was still a few years off; it was largely the popularity of Pickett’s versions of his songs which set him on his way to soul superstardom.

    For years fans of Pickett and Womack have been hoping for a collection which brings together all of their collaborations – not least Cliff White, who conceived this project way back in 1984. At long last, here it is. (The reason for the lengthy gestation period is explained in the booklet.) As well as those Womack compositions, by way of a bonus the CD includes Pickett’s very apt version of Womack mentor Sam Cooke’s classic ‘Bring It On Home To Me’ and both sides of Womack’s own lone Atlantic single.

    Recorded in Memphis and Muscle Shoals with the leading studio musicians of the day – including Womack on guitar and backing vocals on many of the tracks – “Wilson Pickett Sings Bobby Womack” is in many ways the great lost Pickett album, and one which compares very favourably with any of his official Atlantic releases of the period. Extensively annotated, handsomely illustrated and with a cover design that pays homage to those late 60s Atlantic albums, this is a compilation no Pickett fan can afford to be without.

    TONY ROUNCE (Ace Records)

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  • Lester Ketty - Love is For Everyone – The 1962 Sessions (CD)

    13,00

    Ketty Lester’s 1962 version of ’Love Letters’, a song originally composed by Victor Young and Edward Heyman for the motion picture of the same name which starred Jennifer Jones, forever linked her to that exclusive club, ’the one-hit wonder”.

    Here Jasmine have put together a charming collection which opens of course with the album ’Love Letters’ which appears in its entirety along with a selection of bonus singles which include ’But Not For Me’, ’You Can’t Fool A Fool’ and ’This Land is Your Land’ which were all minor hits for her.

    These lovingly remastered tracks prove that along with being a successful actress she was also a superb song stylist and hopefully this collection of 20 tracks goes someway to lift the ’one hit-wonder’ tag.

    Fully Detailed liner notes.

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  • Various - Nothing But A House Party: The Birth Of The Philly Sound 1967-71 (CD)

    18,00

    Like the Motown Sound of the mid-60s, the Philly Sound of the 70s did not suddenly appear overnight with the establishment of Philadelphia International Records and the rise to international stardom of acts such as the O Jays, the Three Degrees and Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes.

    This new Kent release Nothing But A House Party focuses its attention on the years 1967-1971 and provides a first-class overview of how recording in Philadelphia moved on from the lightweight Cameo-Parkway sound of the early 60s to become considerably more inventive and sophisticated. Most of the musicians heard on these tracks became part of MFSB, the musical backbone of nearly every black American recording that came out of Philly between 1971 and 1976. Many of the songwriters and producers also went on to far greater fame in the 70s, after honing their craft with these and many other classics. Some artists featured here had fallen by the wayside by the turn of the 1970s, while others had moved their recording base elsewhere but all played a significant role in developing Philadelphia’s standing as one of one of soul music’s most significant cities of the 20th century. With the kind of copiously annotated and illustrated booklet and top-notch mastering you would expect from Kent, this is a release no serious soul fan should overlook.

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  • Holland Eddie - Same + 15 Bonus (CD)

    13,00

    • As a member of the celebrated Holland-Dozier-Holland songwriting team at Motown, Eddie Holland co-wrote memorable hits for artists like The Supremes, The Four Tops, and Marvin Gaye but he started out as a singer with an exciting vocal sound reminiscent of Jackie Wilson.

    • This quintessential release presents Holland’s first and only LP, long forgotten but a fine rediscovered treasure of early Detroit soul. Fifteen hard-to-find sides from the same period issued on various labels have been added to complete the collection

    • Definitive remastered edition. Detailed booklet with rare photos etc

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  • Major Lance - Ain`t No Soul In These Old Shoes 2CD – The Complete Okeh Recordings 1963-1967 (CD)

    20,00

    Major Lance was one of the most popular soul/R&B singers out of Chicago, enjoying a string of hits for the legendary OKeh Records across the 1960s.

    Early classics such as ’The Monkey Time’, ’Um, Um, Um, Um, Um, Um’, ’Hey Little Girl’ and ’The Matador’ resulted from the patronage of Lance’s friend Curtis Mayfield, producer Carl Davis and arranger Johnny Pate. Lance was also popular with British audiences, his stylish persona attracting the admiration of 60s Mods. . Although his hits lessened as the 60s wore on, the quality of Major Lance’s output remained high and later singles such as ’Investigate’, ’Ain’t No Soul (In These Old Shoes)’ and ’You Don’t Want Me No More’ were massively popular on the Northern Soul scene of the early 1970s.

    This prompted Lance to visit the UK, playing to adoring audiences and resulting in an album, Live At The Torch. Lance continued to record in the States and enjoyed a career renaissance as part of the 80s Beach Music scene. He died in 1994. . Ain’t No Soul (In These Old Shoes) is the first-ever compilation to boast Major Lance’s entire output for OKeh Records between 1963 and 1967, including eleven tracks which are new to CD. . With detailed sleeve-notes and an attractively-designed booklet depicting period labels, record sleeves photos and cuttings, this double-CD is a must for all Sixties, R&B and Northern Soul fans everywhere!

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  • Various - Bob Holmes’ Nashville Soul (CD)

    18,00

    With the publication of E. Mark Windle’s book House Of Broken Hearts about the 60s soul of Nashville, that citys black music is being studied in detail for the first time since Kent issued the CDs Music City Soul and Uptown Down South in the late 90s.

    Kent have coordinated a Nashville Soul CD release with the book, concentrating on the work of multi-talented producer/arranger/songwriter Bob Holmes from the 1965 to 1980 time span. Considering the number of tracks he was involved with on this and the previous CDs, Holmes can be described as Nashville’s premier soul provider. Since Kent accessed the Ted Jarrett and Excello tapes for those earlier compilations, more music has emerged from Holmes vault and elsewhere. The Hytones are the most prolific of the acts, with their superb harmony song Runaway Girl only previously available on a Kent/100 Club promo CD. Kent also feature their rare deep soul Abet release I’ve Got My Baby and a great previously unheard group duet with the Avons called Ooh Gilly Baby, dedicated to a local DJ. The Avons also provide their rare Abet 45 Got To Get Used To You which, like most of these songs, is debuting on CD. Sandra King’s Leave It Up To The Boys is an expensive record to find and shows how Holmes was stylistically influenced more by New York and Detroit than Memphis. Freddie North’s beautiful big beat ballad Don’t Let Me Look So Bad could have been cut at Scepter, and the Paramount Four’s stunning You Must Leave Her Because You Love Her is similarly polished. Holmes worked extensively with R&B producer Ted Jarrett and they combined with great Nashville singers such as Gene Allison, Roscoe Shelton and Freddie Waters to make superb late 60s soul with a strong funk feel. Holmes even wrote and produced a blues hit on veteran Slim Harpo with Tip On In. By the 70s his expertise was appreciated by other companies and he arranged Joe Tex’s hit dance track Under Your Powerful Love for Dial as well as Bill Brandon’s modern soul classic The Streets Got My Lady for Piedmont. Holmes could deliver the authentic southern sound as well with Jimmy Church’s Right In The Palm Of Your Hand on his Southern Artists label and a beautiful unfinished version of Crying Won’t Help You Now by Johnny Truitt for Excello. The Golden Bond’s I Know It’s All Over is a superb harmony single on DeLuxe, Roger Hatcher’s Volt 45 I Dedicate My Life To You demonstrates great musical sensitivity and Ruthie’s smooth Let’s Try Love Again from 1980 is evidence that Holmes could move with the times.

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