LP

Näytetään tulokset 1–24 / 188

  • White Knuckles Trio - Got It Bad LP+CD (LP)

    20,00 5,00

    Vuonna 2011 perustetun trion muodostavat monessa liemessä uinut, viimeistään kokopitkän Knucklebonehead – elokuvan myötä Suomen riiviörokkariksi julistettu, 20-vuotistaiteilijavuotta viettävä Knucklebone Oscar, häiriintyneen persoonallinen solisti-rumpali Yukka White sekä Pianisti Hillside Kumpulainen. “Got it bad” on omaleimainen yhdistelmä yhtyeen omia biisejä sekä vanhoja blues- & gospelkappaleita.

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  • Cash Johnny - And The Philharmonic Orchestra (LP)

    27,00 17,50

    Nyt Johnny Cash uusinta käsittelyssä. Toimiihan tämäkin hienosti.

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  • Chatham County Line - Speed of the Whippoorwill (LP)

    27,00 15,00

    On their third album in four years, Chatham County Line enlisted producer Brian Paulson to help them bring their raw & ready vision to digital. Featuring ten new Dave Wilson originals, a co-write between him and mandonlinist John Teer, a Teer original, and one by banjoist Chandler Holt, along with a cover of Don Robertson, the formula isn’t all that different — most of this is contemporary bluegrass that could have been recorded in the heyday of the Stanley Brothers or Bill Monroe’s Bluegrass Boys. Speed of the Whippoorwill is more sophisticated, however, mostly in the lyrics of Wilson, who employs humor along with heartbreak in his songs. There is a more Mark Twain-like view of the world, even if it is obvious in places. Check the lyrics to By the Riverside”: ”Skipped out of work, just to ease my thoughts/Went down to the riverside, just to get lost/Got some fishing line and a hickory limb/Sat there thinking about Huck & Jim.” The bluegrass stomp is plentiful here and it always works: ”Company Blues,” ”Rock Pile,” the breakdown ”Savoy Special,” and ”Coming Home.” Less successful are the ballads, such as the Louvin Brothers-inspired ”They Were Just Children” and ”Waiting Paradise.” They’re too long, even as story-songs, and they are wordy and overly redundant of their forbears. However, the swinging bluegrass of ”Day I Die” is tight, melodic, full of killer harmonies, and punchy as all get out. ”Confederate Soldier” is a straight-up country tune with Greg Reading playing pedal steel, and lyrically it works, but again, it takes too long for the story to reveal itself. For those who enjoyed the first pair of Chatham County Line records, this one will not come as a surprise, but will appear more adventurous. For those just coming to the band, either the band’s self-titled debut or Route 23 would be better places to begin. ~ Thom Jurek, All Music Guide”

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  • Brown James - Love Power Peace 3LP (LP)

    65,00 45,00

    2014 first release of the triple vinyl LP set as envisioned by James Brown.Includes deluxe jacket with rare photos & liner notes by Alan Leeds.

    Mastered from Brown’s 1971 mixdown reels, unused until now James Brown’s magnum opus! Love Power Peace is the sound of the Godfather with his youngblood J.B.’s (including Bootsy and Catfish Collins) electrifying a crazed Parisian audience on March 8, 1971.

    Sequenced & mixed by Brown himself for a planned triple album, the set was shelved when key band members departed before it could be issued.

    Here, for the first time, are the sides as intended, exactly as delivered by James Brown Productions to his label in 1971. Brown & the J.B.’s rip through recent singles like ”Sex Machine, ” ”Super Bad, ” ”Give It Up or Turnit a Loose” and ”Get Up, Get Into It, Get Involved” with a metronomic precision laid down by bassist Bootsy Collins and drummer Jabo Starks. ”Ain’t It Funky Now” – formerly a slow, simmering groove – is transformed into a fast, funky tour de force in which newbie Catfish Collins unleashes one of the most badass guitar solos ever, while a medley of three other Brown standards (”Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag”/”I Got You (I Feel Good)”/”I Got the Feelin’ ”) blazes by faster than the Godfather of Soul’s personal Learjet. Interspersed with just the right amount of slow numbers like ”Georgia on My Mind, ”

    it also includes tracks from the show’s supporting acts that were not included on the 1992 CD (which was a remixed, incomplete show).

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  • Neil Fred - Same (Ltd, Coloured) (LP)

    27,00 22,00

    Clear colored vinyl LP pressing.

    A moody NYC masterpiece from The Village circa ’66! New York folk artist Fred Neil’s eponymous second album may not have been a sales smash, but it inspired countless contemporaries, from Jefferson Airplane to Crosby, Stills & Nash, to Harry Nilsson. It was the latter’s cover of ”Everybody’s Talkin’,” featured in the Midnight Cowboy soundtrack, that garnered Neil his greatest notoriety, but the album is full of shimmering, surreal gems, like ”The Dolphins” and the stunning ”Faretheewell.” Neil disappeared into reclusiveness not long after, but his legacy as a thoughtful, complex songwriter lives on. With a deeply resonant voice that exudes a hundred different things at once – pain, joy, weariness, and decades of experience – Fred Neil created an influential body of work that far outweighs it’s modest size. Few artists from the vibrant early ’60s Greenwich Village folk scene had more staying power than this legendary recluse, a figure who inspired the likes of Bob Dylan, Jefferson Airplane, and countless others.

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  • Reed Lulu - Blue and Moody (LP)

    29,00 22,00

    Rare 1958 KING albumi uusintapainoksena!

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  • NRBQ - Workshop (Colored Vinyl, Blue) (LP)

    27,00 22,00

    Limited blue colored vinyl LP pressing. The wildly eclectic New Rhythm & Blues Quintet, better known to it’s worldwide legion of adoring fans as NRBQ (or just the Q!), is the only band on the planet that can play rockabilly, bar-band blooze, Beatles sound-alikes and Sun Ra-style free jazz in the same set and remain standing. By the time keyboardist Terry Adams, vocalist Frank Gadler, bassist Joey Spampinato, drummer Tom Staley and fabulous new guitarist Al Anderson released Scraps, their wonderful second album in 1972, they had relocated from Florida to New Jersey-and, like their name says, they were actually a quintet for the only time in their career. From the infectious ”Howard Johnston’s Got His Ho-Jo Working” to the lovably understated ”Magnet,” Scraps is loaded with NRBQ classics that lived up to the eye-popping press garnered by their self-titled 1969 debut. The Q immediately followed Scraps with 1973?s equally terrific Workshop. Gadler had departed, reducing the Quintet to it’s customary foursome (natch!), but the band never missed a beat with an album that featured the hypnotically chugging ”Come On If You’re Coming,” the mouth-watering ”RC Cola and a Moon Pie” and the ultra-prophetic ”Get That Gasoline Blues.”

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  • Kessel Barney - Live At The Jazz Mill 1954, Vol 2 (LP)

    29,00 22,00

    This is another album of relaxed, swingin’ jazz from Kessel and the Jazz Millers–Pete Jolly-piano, Art Kile-drums, and Gene Stoffel-bass. Like the first volume, these tapes come from a young audiophile who brought his tape machine into the club to record various performers playing there. The sound is warm and actually pretty clean sounding, with a feel of the ’50s. Both volumes are issued on the Modern Harmonic label which is part of the Sundazed label. The disc slips into a pocket in the wallet style cardboard package. There’s a nice two page essay on the inside panels and a track list, photo of the group, and recording info on the back cover.

    This is a good chance for Kessel and/or jazz guitar fans in general to hear a true master of jazz guitar, playing with a small sympathetic group. The ’50s is when Kessel was either near or at the top of jazz polls, and these live tapes will show why that was. Jolly’s piano is also a great feature here. His playing accents Kessel’s lyrical style–listen to ”Tea For Two” as just one example of how well they play together.

    Like the first volume, this album is filled with standards like ”Indian Summer”, ”Blue Moon” (with a nice bass solo), ”I Can’t Get Started” (a beautiful version), ”Godchild” (Kessel’s playing is especially lyrical), and a couple of other tunes. The small club ambience helps define this music–a good example of jazz in a small club that didn’t last a year before closing it’s doors. That fact makes these tapes not only rare, but historic as well. And Kessel’s and the group’s relaxed familiarity with these tunes makes for a good listening experience.

    Kessel fans should check out both volumes. Both are full of Kessel in his prime, backed by a fine pianist and a rhythm section that is never intrusive yet pushed the music along nicely. For swinging, fluid, ’50s jazz guitar, both volumes deserve attention from fans. Both are good examples of what small gigs were like during this era. Can you imagine what it would be like to walk into a small club like the Jazz Mill and hear Kessel during his best years? Both volumes can sit next to other Kessel albums from this prime era.

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  • Cochran Wayne - Same (180 gram, Gatefold) (LP)

    29,00 22,00

    Signed by Chess, Cochran and the Riders released their first LP in 1967. Produced by Abner Spector with sessions at Miami’s Criteria Studios and Muscle Shoals’ Fame Studios, the cleverly-titled ”Wayne Cochran” offered up a mix of popular R&B and soul songs which apparently served as a reflection of the group’s live act. To be honest, if you were looking for something original and ground breaking, this wasn’t the place to start. While Cochran’s performances were quite energetic (having one of the era’s tightest backing bands certainly didn’t hurt), none of the twelve arrangements strayed far from the originals. I’m guessing that most of the things that supposedly made these guys such a killer live act simply couldn’t be replicated on vinyl – not to imply that the collection was bad. It wasn’t. Individually most of the songs were quite good, but it you were familiar with the originals, stripped of Cochran’s in-concert craziness, they simply couldn’t compete.

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  • Allman Sheldon - Folk Songs For The 21st Century (Ltd, Plutonium green) (LP)

    35,00 22,00

    A time capsule of atomic-age country, radioactive rockabilly, and other-wordly melodies! Sheldon Allman (the singing voice of Mr. Ed!) brings you this long-out-of-print bunker full of plutonium-charged songs about space and destruction. Features “Crawl Out Through The Fallout” and “Radioactive Mama,” as heard in the Fallout video game series! Modern Harmonic proudly resurrects this wonderfully mystifying LP!

    A true creative treasure, the Chicago born and Canada raised Sheldon Allman was a graduate of the Los Angeles Conservatory of Music. Known well as an actor, Sheldon also composed and sung the theme song for 60’s cartoon cult classic George Of The Jungle. Additionally, as the singing voice of Mr. Ed, he released a 45 of “Pretty Little Filly” and “The Empty Feedbag Blues.” Most rare and coveted of his musical treasures was Folk Songs For The 21st Century, a concept album with a twisted futuristic outer space take on the atom craze. As an actor, Allman has over 50 credits to his name including films Hud!, In Cold Blood, and various roles on anything from Little House On The Prairie to the Twilight Zone. Modern Harmonic has taken this lost treasure and celebrates its eclectic rockabilly-ish uniqueness on plutonium green vinyl!!!

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  • Various - Jazz For Hi-fi Lovers (LP)

    35,00 22,00

    A smart set of fine beat-era jazz, beautifully programed and compiled for the hi-fi in your home! Includes some of the top players of the era – Zoot Sims, Paul Quinichette, Gene Roland, and others – in selections suited for a swingin’ starlit session! Jazz for Hi-Fi Lovers, from the original mono reels and pressed on colored vinyl!

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  • Roadrunners - Same (LP)

    29,00 22,00

    All tracks side one are mono. All tracks side two are stereo.
    All Tracks recorded between 1966-1967.

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  • NRBQ - Scraps (Ltd, Coloured) (LP)

    29,00 22,00

    Limited red colored vinyl LP pressing.

    The wildly eclectic New Rhythm & Blues Quintet, better known to it’s worldwide legion of adoring fans as NRBQ (or just the Q!), is the only band on the planet that can play rockabilly, bar-band blooze, Beatles sound-alikes and Sun Ra-style free jazz in the same set and remain standing. By the time keyboardist Terry Adams, vocalist Frank Gadler, bassist Joey Spampinato, drummer Tom Staley and fabulousnew guitarist Al Anderson released Scraps, their wonderful second album in 1972, they had relocated from Florida to New Jersey-and, like their name says, they were actually a quintet for the only time in their career. From the infectious ”Howard Johnston’s Got His Ho-Jo Working” to the loveably understated ”Magnet,” Scraps is loaded with NRBQ classics that lived up to the eye-popping press garnered by their self-titled 1969 debut. The Q immediately followed Scraps with 1973’s equally terrific Workshop. Gadler had departed, reducing the Quintet to it’s customary foursome (natch!), but the band never missed a beat with an album that featured the hypnotically chugging ”Come On If You’re Coming,” the mouth-watering ”RC Cola and a Moon Pie” and the ultra-prophetic ”Get That Gasoline Blues.”

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  • Reckless Kelly - Bulletproof 2LP (LP)

    29,00 18,00

    Reckless Kelly is back on the rock n’ roll stage with BULLETPROOF, their most ambitious and venomous album to date. Rollicking guitars and a relentlessly aggressive rhythm section pound out political statements alongside epic road anthems and ragged love songs. As always, Reckless brings it’s indomitable Texas spirit to the new album, resulting in what promises to be the band’s most immediate offering of their promises to be the band’s most immediate offering of their career. Recorded at Willie Nelson’s legendary Perdernales Studios in Lake Travis, Texas, BULLETPROOF is a call to arms, an opening salvo in Reckless Kelly’s campaign to spread the nearly religious dedication of it’s Texas followers to fans all across the U.S. of A.

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  • Chatham County Line - Sight & Sound 2LP+DVD (LP)

    45,00 25,00

    One summer evening in downtown Raleigh, NC, Chatham County Line set up shop at a stately theater filled with hundreds of their most devoted fans and captured for the ages what they do best: gathering around a single microphone to play and sing their own songs.

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