Chatham County Line

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  • Chatham County Line - Speed of the Whippoorwill (LP)

    27,00 15,00

    On their third album in four years, Chatham County Line enlisted producer Brian Paulson to help them bring their raw & ready vision to digital. Featuring ten new Dave Wilson originals, a co-write between him and mandonlinist John Teer, a Teer original, and one by banjoist Chandler Holt, along with a cover of Don Robertson, the formula isn’t all that different — most of this is contemporary bluegrass that could have been recorded in the heyday of the Stanley Brothers or Bill Monroe’s Bluegrass Boys. Speed of the Whippoorwill is more sophisticated, however, mostly in the lyrics of Wilson, who employs humor along with heartbreak in his songs. There is a more Mark Twain-like view of the world, even if it is obvious in places. Check the lyrics to By the Riverside”: ”Skipped out of work, just to ease my thoughts/Went down to the riverside, just to get lost/Got some fishing line and a hickory limb/Sat there thinking about Huck & Jim.” The bluegrass stomp is plentiful here and it always works: ”Company Blues,” ”Rock Pile,” the breakdown ”Savoy Special,” and ”Coming Home.” Less successful are the ballads, such as the Louvin Brothers-inspired ”They Were Just Children” and ”Waiting Paradise.” They’re too long, even as story-songs, and they are wordy and overly redundant of their forbears. However, the swinging bluegrass of ”Day I Die” is tight, melodic, full of killer harmonies, and punchy as all get out. ”Confederate Soldier” is a straight-up country tune with Greg Reading playing pedal steel, and lyrically it works, but again, it takes too long for the story to reveal itself. For those who enjoyed the first pair of Chatham County Line records, this one will not come as a surprise, but will appear more adventurous. For those just coming to the band, either the band’s self-titled debut or Route 23 would be better places to begin. ~ Thom Jurek, All Music Guide”

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  • Chatham County Line - Sight & Sound 2LP+DVD (LP)

    45,00 25,00

    One summer evening in downtown Raleigh, NC, Chatham County Line set up shop at a stately theater filled with hundreds of their most devoted fans and captured for the ages what they do best: gathering around a single microphone to play and sing their own songs.

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  • Chatham County Line - Tightrope LP + CD (LP)

    29,00 17,00

    Entering their second decade as an ensemble, Chatham County Line bring a deep reverence for traditional American roots music and timeless bluegrass instrumentation to insightful, poetic original songs that are powerfully contemporary yet rich with the complex resonance of their southern heritage. Over the course of six studio albums and performances around the world, they have pursued a singular style that is entirely their own, yet connects with audiences from all walks.

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  • Chatham County Line - Autumn (LP)

    27,00 15,00

    Our band is a lot like this place, ” says Chatham County Line guitarist, lead singer and songwriter Dave Wilson. His eyes wander across the original hardwood lanes of the mid-century Raleigh bowling alley where he just finished rolling and drinking two rounds. Playing traditional string band instrumentation around a single microphone while clad in suits and ties visually projects a similar sepia-toned timelessness. ”We create a product that you’re familiar with and you’ll enjoy going back to because you know what to expect. My dad ran a local hardware store years ago and I always felt like we shared that.” Sure enough, like a small town store, there’s no dramatic tale or sexy hook to fuel the hype machine for Autumn, the seventh studio album since the Raleigh, NC-based Chatham County Line-Wilson, John Teer (mandolin/fiddle), Chandler Holt (banjo), and Greg Readling (bass, pedal steel, piano)-coalesced in the late 1990’s. Instead, the story behind the workmanlike group’s newest release-available September 2, 2016 via Yep Roc Records-is simple: A veteran ensemble at the top of it’s game sticking to it’s considerable strengths-poignant songwriting and inventive acoustic arrangements that draw upon a broad array of American roots influences, highlighted by trademark three- and four-part harmonies that shine throughout. ”We were so obsessive about the way Tightrope sounded and making sure we got the songs right that this record was kind of a 180 from that, ” Wilson explains, referring to the meticulous, multi-year process that birthed Autumn’s predecessor. ”I think we were all exhausted from that process and wanted to just take the songs I had written and record them.” Thanks to the more casual approach, Autumn marries the comfortable maturity of 2014’s Tightrope with the welcome spontaneity of Chatham County Line’s earlier work. Though the year between sessions wasn’t dedicated to consciously working on the record, it was perhaps the most productive period for the songs to take shape, according to Wilson. ”It’s like leaving your desk and taking a walk: You have your best ideas when you’re not working on what you’re supposed to be working on.

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  • Chatham County Line - Sharing the Covers (LP)

    27,00 15,00

    Vinyl LP pressing includes digital download. North Carolina-based ensemble Chatham County Line’s eighth studio album, Sharing The Covers is, at it’s core, a tribute to those whom the band hold dear, and a chance for the group to perform modern and traditional classics in the bluegrass-style they’re known for best. On the 13-track collection, Chatham County Line takes the familiar and adds a touch of originality to create a wholly new and inventive roster of covers by Tom Petty, Alton Delmore, John Lennon, The Louvin Brothers, Beck, James Hunter, Wilco and more. Recorded at Durham, NC’s Overdub Lane studio, where they cut their first album, where 2010’s Wildwood was mixed, and where a few tracks from 2016’s Autumn were recorded, Sharing The Covers was engineered by Chris Boerner, who also engineers the band’s live shows.

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  • Chatham County Line - Same (CD)

    18,00

    Whereas the majority of contemporary bluegrass albums are cleaned up and refined to the point of sounding a little sterile, on their self-titled debut, Chatham County Line demonstrate the importance of a warm and organic recording environment and how it leads to a naturally soulful end result. Centered around a single microphone, the band plays acoustic bluegrass instruments in the traditional style, but there’s a sly wink in the music — like in the trunk of their 1946 Nash Rambler there may be some Lynyrd Skynyrd and Allman Brothers records underneath the Bill Monroe and Flatt & Scruggs LPs. Any nods to rock & roll are successfully stifled in their songwriting though, as the band specializes in purely honest and irony-free honky tonk bluegrass, earnestly sung and expertly picked as if marketing strategies” and ”the 18-24 demographic” never existed. In fact, if the sound quality weren’t so terrific, it would be easy to convince any of the O Brother, Where Art Thou neophytes that this in fact is a lost recording of Jimmy Martin jamming with the Osborne Brothers backstage at the 1967 Bean Blossom Festival.

    The tearfully beautiful ”WSM (650)” recounts vocalist Dave Wilson’s childhood memories of growin’ up poor with only the light from the Grand Ole Opry coming through his family’s old RCA radio to keep him warm. While the subject could seem trite or even mocking, the band’s reverence for the institution of old Nashville and the memories of childhood keep the song faithful to the writer’s intentions. Similarly, the epic story-song ”Song for John Hartford” is not only a passionate tribute to the fiddle player, but contains enough historical information that it should be taught to third-graders along with story problems and the names of the planets. Other highlights include the mouth-watering ”Bacon in the Skillet,” the pleading ”Sightseeing,” guaranteed to get any man out of the doghouse, a reverent cover of Bob Dylan’s ”I Shall Be Released,” and damn near every other track on the record. The album falls into the category of ”carpet music” because it is wall-to-wall good, covering everything from beginning to end with no marks where the seams meet and no holes in the weave — just a solid, beautiful collection of terrific songs and equally terrific performances. ~ Zac Johnson, All Music Guide”

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  • Chatham County Line - Speed of the Whippoorwill (CD)

    18,00

    On their third album in four years, Chatham County Line enlisted producer Brian Paulson to help them bring their raw & ready vision to digital. Featuring ten new Dave Wilson originals, a co-write between him and mandonlinist John Teer, a Teer original, and one by banjoist Chandler Holt, along with a cover of Don Robertson, the formula isn’t all that different — most of this is contemporary bluegrass that could have been recorded in the heyday of the Stanley Brothers or Bill Monroe’s Bluegrass Boys. Speed of the Whippoorwill is more sophisticated, however, mostly in the lyrics of Wilson, who employs humor along with heartbreak in his songs. There is a more Mark Twain-like view of the world, even if it is obvious in places. Check the lyrics to By the Riverside”: ”Skipped out of work, just to ease my thoughts/Went down to the riverside, just to get lost/Got some fishing line and a hickory limb/Sat there thinking about Huck & Jim.” The bluegrass stomp is plentiful here and it always works: ”Company Blues,” ”Rock Pile,” the breakdown ”Savoy Special,” and ”Coming Home.” Less successful are the ballads, such as the Louvin Brothers-inspired ”They Were Just Children” and ”Waiting Paradise.” They’re too long, even as story-songs, and they are wordy and overly redundant of their forbears. However, the swinging bluegrass of ”Day I Die” is tight, melodic, full of killer harmonies, and punchy as all get out. ”Confederate Soldier” is a straight-up country tune with Greg Reading playing pedal steel, and lyrically it works, but again, it takes too long for the story to reveal itself. For those who enjoyed the first pair of Chatham County Line records, this one will not come as a surprise, but will appear more adventurous. For those just coming to the band, either the band’s self-titled debut or Route 23 would be better places to begin. ~ Thom Jurek, All Music Guide”

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